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Both species of skunks found in Georgia are quite beautiful, but they are often viewed negatively due to the pungent, musky odor they can emit. This odor lingers for days and can become nauseating for some people. They also dig up lawns in search of insects and grubworms and raid backyard poultry pens and eat eggs and birds; eat garden vegetables; and damage beehives. CAES News
Skunk Control
It's the time of year when females skunks give birth. The two skunk species found in Georgia are striped skunks (polecats) and eastern spotted skunks (civet cats).
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Network Leader
University of Georgia agricultural climatologist Pam Knox has been named interim director of UGA’s network of 86 weather stations across Georgia.
Newly named University of Georgia turfgrass researcher David Jespersen was among the UGA experts who presented their research findings at the Turfgrass Research Field Day on Thursday, Aug. 4. Jespersen is shown sharing the results of a UGA research project that evaluated the drought tolerance of four turfgrass species. CAES News
Turfgrass Field Day
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day is set for Thursday, Aug. 9, on the UGA Griffin campus. The event will include updates on the latest research about the diseases, insects and weeds that affect Georgia turfgrasses.
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Mobile Markets
There’s nothing tastier than fresh greens or summer tomatoes from the neighborhood farmers market, but if you can’t make it to a market in metro Atlanta this summer, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has you covered.
When collecting wild raspberry seeds in Australia, University of Georgia scientist Rachel Itle first had to “calibrate” her eyes to search for the tiny, red berries. This, made finding them easier, but the wild berries were not plentiful. Some were bright red, some dull red and some golden, and the fruit is about a half or a fourth the size of commercial berries sold in the U.S., she said. CAES News
New Fruit
University of Georgia horticulturists Rachel Itle and Dario Chavez recently travelled to Australia to collect seeds from wild raspberries and peaches to bring back to the UGA Griffin campus. As scientists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Itle and Chavez research Georgia-grown fruit.
University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments. CAES News
Paul Raymer
More than 40 years ago, a young man from Arkansas decided to become an agriculture major because "it was the beginning of the Green Revolution, and agriculture had a bright future." Today that man, University of Georgia professor Paul Raymer, has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder.
When Kathleen Chumbley Freeman was a student at UGA-Griffin, she served as a student ambassador and president of the campus's student advisory council. Now she has joined the staff of the campus as the program coordinator for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Ag Coordinator
Kathleen Chumbley Freeman has joined the University of Georgia Griffin campus as the academic program coordinator for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
A survey of the state's sod inventory is conducted each year by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Urban Ag Council. Each year, Georgia sod producers and other members of the industry, including equipment manufacturers, gather for the annual Sod Field Day. This photo shows a sod harvester being demonstrated. CAES News
Sod Prices
Georgia’s supply of sodded turfgrass will sufficiently cover demand this year, and the delivery cost is not expected to rise, according to the Annual Georgia Sod Producers Inventory Survey conducted by Clint Waltz, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist, and the Georgia Urban Ag Council.
Charlotte Moser, a seventh-grader from Clarke Middle School in Athens, Georgia, won first place for her horror movie-inspired poster of a radon cloud enveloping a castle in the 2017 poster contest held by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension's Radon Education Program. CAES News
Radon Poster Winners
As part of a contest conducted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program, students from across the state created posters highlighting the dangers of radon, an odorless, colorless and flavorless gas that is present in some Georgia soils.