Menu

Browse Center for Food Safety Stories

40 results found for Center for Food Safety
web Esseili 3 bck blurred CAES News
Cold Facts
According to the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety study, SARS-CoV-2 experimentally introduced onto berries remained infectious on frozen berries for at least a month. Refrigerating berries at 39 degrees Fahrenheit showed a 90% reduction in SARS-CoV-2 infectivity over the course of three days, as did washing berries before freezing.
Researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering are developing a new way to detect potentially deadly Listeria contamination in food. CAES News
Listeria Rapid Test
Researchers at the University of Georgia are developing a new way to detect potentially deadly Listeria contamination in food. Listeriosis, an infection caused by eating food contaminated by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, can cause severe illness in pregnant women, newborns, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems.
esseili web CAES News
COVID digestive symptoms
From the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, experts and health officials have witnessed a wide variety of symptoms — one patient may have a severe cough, while another may have no symptoms at all. A new study by University of Georgia virologist Malak Esseili points to the reasons that some patients have digestive issues with COVID-19 and others do not.
The International Association for Food Protection (IAFP) has named Francisco Diez-Gonzalez the 2022 recipient of the Harry Haverland Citation Award. “By serving IAFP, I contribute to creating opportunities for younger generations,” Diez said. CAES News
Harry Haverland Citation Award
Francisco Diez-Gonzalez, director of the University of Georgia’s Center for Food Safety, is the 2022 recipient of the Harry Haverland Citation Award from the International Association for Food Protection. Diez was nominated for the award, which is given “to an individual for years of devotion to the ideals and objectives of IAFP,” by 2003 Harry Haverland award recipient and CFS emeritus faculty member Larry Beuchat.
colistin (1) CAES News
Global Fight Against Antimicrobial Resistance
The overuse of the antibiotic colistin has contributed to the rise of antimicrobial resistance, “one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity,” according to the World Health Organization. To preserve colistin’s efficacy, the U.S. does not use it in food animals, and now, thanks to the efforts of University of Georgia Professor Issmat Kassem, Lebanon has followed suit, banning it for agricultural use.
Refugees 1 CAES News
Refugee Disease Risk
The destruction caused by war is evident both in its toll to human life and its impact on infrastructure. Those who are lucky enough to escape violence face many challenges, from finding a safe place to live to securing employment, but another threat could further jeopardize their ability to survive — an increased risk of illness. 
Diez web CAES News
Center for Food Safety
Foodborne illnesses affect more than 600 million people each year worldwide. In 2018, the U.N. General Assembly established June 7 as World Food Safety Day to bring awareness of foodborne risks and “to celebrate the myriad benefits of safe food.”
Foodborne botulism can be prevented with proper canning techniques and equipment that prevent contamination, according to UGA Extension food safety specialist Carla Schwan. CAES News
Canning Precautions
As home canning season approaches, a University of Georgia food safety expert stressed the need for proper precautions to avoid foodborne illness. A recent death in Washington state was attributed to botulism, a toxin that is a byproduct of the heat-resistant spores of a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum that likely originated from a home-canned food.
iStock 1281888457 (1) CAES News
Lettuce Microbiome
Often referred to as leafy greens, lettuce and other similar vegetables are a common source of foodborne illnesses. The contamination of lettuce with Escherichia coli O157:H7, also known as EcO157, has been a grave concern for decades.