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Mosquito control is a five-step process that includes education, surveillance, source reduction, larviciding and adulticiding. (Photo by David Cappaert, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Managing Mosquitoes
With summer and the first tropical storm of the season arriving simultaneously this year, we're getting warm, wet weather at a time when more folks are spending time outside. This combination is sure to signal a rise in mosquito interactions, making it a perfect time to think about mosquito control around your home and community.
Argentine black and white tegus, the largest of all tegus, can reach 4 feet long and weigh 10 pounds or more. CAES News
Invasive Tegus
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is assisting the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) in the effort to find and remove tegus from the wild in southeast Georgia, and the public’s help remains critical to keeping these big, South American lizards from getting a toehold in the state.
Longtime UGA Tifton entomologist Michael Toews will become the assistant dean of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to oversee the Tifton Campus at the end of this month. CAES News
Toews will succeed retiring West
Michael Toews has been named assistant dean of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to oversee the Tifton Campus.
Michael Toews, entomology professor and co-director of UGA's Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, and his graduate student team of Apurba Barman (foreground), Lauren Perez (background, left) and Sarah Hobby inspect sorghum plants near Tifton for signs of invasive sugarcane aphids. CAES News
Unwelcome Visitors
Earlier this year, Chuck Bargeron learned how to catch a Burmese python.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Wild Spotter App
Thanks to a new app, citizen scientists can help researchers track and stop the spread of invasive species like feral pigs, Chinese privet, cogongrass and kudzu bugs by reporting and mapping sightings of these invasive species.
An Asian longhorned beetle chews through wood. CAES News
Invasive Species
Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.