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D.W. Brooks lecturer Ismahane Elouafi is the UN Food and Agriculture Organization's first chief scientist. Her talk, “How science, technology and innovation can accelerate the transformation of our agri-food systems,” will be hosted on Zoom at 3:30 p.m. Nov. 2. CAES News
2021 D.W. Brooks Lecture
Chief scientist of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Ismahane Elouafi is set to deliver the talk at this year's D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards, which will be held virtually Nov. 2. Elouafi’s lecture, “How science, technology and innovation can accelerate the transformation of our agri-food systems,” will highlight the advancement of e-agriculture and it’s benefits for farming around the world.
Entomosporium leaf spot on Photinia (Red Tip). Small reddish leaf spots appear initially. As spots age, center is grayish with a dark purple border. Leaf spots may coalesce causing severe leaf blight. Severely infected leaves drop prematurely. Over time severely infected plants die. Infection is favored by poor air circulation and prolonged periods of leaf wetness. CAES News
Leaf spot disease
Excessive rain signals another a bad year for leaf spot diseases on landscape trees and shrubs. The leaf spotting that affects pear trees, including both edible pears and ornamental Bradford types, is caused by a fungal disease known as Entomosporium leaf spot. This disease also affects related shrubs such as Indian hawthorn and red tip photinia.
Professor David Bertioli and his wife, Soraya Leal-Bertioli, senior research scientist, work together with peanut plants in their greenhouses at the Center for Applied Genetic Technologies. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Wild Peanut Genes
A decade ago, University of Georgia plant scientists David and Soraya Bertioli were living and working in Brazil when they began to wonder about peanut plants they encountered in different corners of the world with an astounding ability to withstand fungal diseases without the use of fungicides. The Bertiolis wondered if these different plants might all have something in common. Did they owe their natural resistance to a single genetic source?
“To my knowledge, this is the all-time highest funding amount the UGA IPM program has received, which is incredible because this is a highly competitive national grant,” said Ash Sial, coordinator of UGA's integrated pest management program. CAES News
IPM Grant
An impressive team of University of Georgia researchers has received $765,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture Crop Protection and Pest Management Program to support the continuation of integrated pest management (IPM) programming throughout the state over the next three years.
peaches CAES News
Pigskin and Peaches
Georgia and South Carolina share a border, a passion for football and pride in their peaches. With the University of Georgia and Clemson University campuses separated by a mere 70 miles, the Bulldogs and Tigers began fighting it out on the football field in 1897, with the teams set to meet for the 65th time on Sept. 4. As pitched as the battle is on the football field, there’s an even deeper rivalry between the two states when it comes to their peaches.
Plant pathology graduate student Makayla Mitchell has received faculty support in UGA's Department of Plant Pathology to create a research project that aligned with her interests. CAES News
REEU Program
As a plant science and biotechnology major at Fort Valley State University, Makayla Mitchell knew she wanted to get research experience outside of her home institution. She found that opportunity in the Research and Extension Experiences for Undergraduates (REEU) program in Crop Genetics and Genomics at CAES.
CAES FFAR Fellow Shreena Pradhan and Sujan Paudel CAES News
FFAR Fellows
Two doctoral candidates in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at University of Georgia have been selected for the 2021 class of the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) Fellows program.
The UGA cotton research team identified 24 Georgia counties where the presence of cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV) has been confirmed from commercial fields and UGA research farms during 2018-2019. CAES News
Cotton Leaf Roll Dwarf Virus
While aphids aren’t a direct threat to cotton plants, they can carry a persistent virus that is difficult to control and can cause significant losses in one of Georgia’s most important crops.
Assistant Professor Li Yang works in a controlled environment growth room for Arabidopsis thaliana research. CAES News
Aging and Immunity
Like people, plants face challenges from microbial pathogens throughout their lifespan. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has provided Li Yang, an assistant professor of plant immunity at the University of Georgia, with the Maximizing Investors’ Research Award (MIRA) totalling $1.75 million to continue his research on the molecular mechanisms of age-related resistance in plants.