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Poison ivy in a forested area. CAES News
Poison Ivy
Poison ivy is a common poisonous plant in Georgia and is infamous for causing allergic reactions for as many as 50 million Americans annually. To manage it effectively and safely, it's important to understand its traits and use the right control methods to deal with this troublesome plant. Mark Czarnota, an associate professor in the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture, provides helpful tips to distinguish poison ivy from common look-alikes and shares several ways to control the irritating plant.
(L-R) Peggy Ozias-Akins and third-year Ph.D. student Yuji Ke working with Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrids plants in the greenhouse. CAES News
UGA Plant Center
The University of Georgia Plant Center is a collection of faculty and scientists from across multiple campuses who share common interests in plant science. From basic science in plant biology and genomics to highly applied projects in genetics and plant breeding, researchers run the gamut of plant-based research. More than 60 faculty are affiliated with the center, hailing from seven departments across four colleges and schools and three separate campuses in Athens, Tifton and Griffin.
Water deeply to ensure that the moisture penetrates deeply into the root growth below. Once or twice a week is enough for most plants. CAES News
Proper Watering
Now that summer is officially upon us, temperatures are up and areas of Georgia are experiencing abnormally dry conditions, you may be worried about how your yard is doing. Proper watering is key to helping your plants thrive. Excessive watering is one of the leading causes of issues in the home landscape. Yes, this issue can be a problem even during prolonged dry spells. A condition known as root rot develops, and marigolds, verbenas, hollies, boxwoods, azaleas and rhododendrons are some of the most sensitive.
Plant genetics research at the University of Georgia spans schools, departments, disciplines, and centers. From the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) to Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, the Plant Center to the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics & Genomics and more, UGA faculty with genetics expertise are seeking plant-based solutions to societal challenges. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker) CAES News
Plant Power
With record-breaking temperatures and extreme weather escalating, the threats posed by climate change are intensifying — but the plants of tomorrow could help us meet the massive challenges of our warming planet. Plant genetics research at the University of Georgia spans schools, departments, disciplines and centers. From the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, UGA faculty with genetics expertise are seeking plant-based solutions to societal challenges.
John Ruter in the UGA Trial Gardens CAES News
Trial Gardens
Visual beauty meets functional research at the University of Georgia Trial Gardens. Located on South Campus, the gardens are home to seeds and plants from nearly every plant breeding company worldwide, grown to service UGA research, teaching and new crop introduction. “The Trial Gardens are the premier campus test site in the southeast for the evaluation of commercial bedding plants and perennials,” said John Ruter, the Trial Gardens director and Allan M. Armitage Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Closeup of small, unripe tomatoes growing in a backyard garden CAES News
Starting a Garden
Whether you are a seasoned gardener or a novice, having a home garden can be an enriching experience. But starting from scratch may seem like a daunting endeavor. To help you embark on this journey, we've compiled a general guide, drawing insights from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension publications and Clarke County Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent Laura Ney on the most important steps for establishing a garden.
A student harvests red clover at UGArden. CAES News
Nurturing With Nature
The field of medicine is ever-changing, and the use of herbal medicines may play a bigger role in health care as the value of natural remedies gain recognition in the Western world. Students at the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are delving into the field of medicinal remedies through the class “Herbs, Spices and Medicinal Plants.” Offered to undergraduate students through the Department of Horticulture, the class helps students develop a deeper understanding of the connection between nature and health.
Peach growers are looking forward to a fruitful season as the weather this winter and spring have been near-perfect for the sensitive crop. This year is projected to be a much-needed comeback from the disastrous season they experienced after a late freeze in March 2023 took out more than 90% of the state's crop. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
2024 Peach Season
Last year, the peach industry lost $60 million due to the late freeze that hit much of the Southeast in mid-March 2023, said Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent for Peach and Taylor counties. With no freezing temperatures in the forecast and hope for strong pricing during the upcoming season, peach growers are looking forward to a much-needed rebound year.
A mug of UGArden's chamomile tea. CAES News
UGArden Tea in Dining Halls
The door to UGArden’s herb drying room leads to an olfactory explosion — sharp peppermint, earthy tulsi, sweet calendula and floral chamomile mix into an herbal perfume that would undoubtedly have tea drinkers reaching for their kettles. Now University of Georgia students will be able to get a taste of UGArden’s chamomile tea, along with a selection of the student community farm’s other herbal teas, with their campus meals as the UGArden medicinal herb program expands into UGA dining halls this spring.