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634 results found for Horticulture
The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Ratcliffe Scholars Program allows students to engage in study abroad opportunities like the CAES Food Production, Culture and the Environment May session in Spain. CAES News
Ratcliffe Scholarship
While classrooms offer important skills and opportunities, not all lessons fit within four walls. Real-world experiences can be more valuable to a student's education than hours spent in lecture halls. 
Soil sample bags await processing at the University of Georgia Soil Testing Laboratory in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Last Minute Gifts
The gift of knowledge is one that any farmer or gardener can truly appreciate. Research is continually finding new and better ways to deal with the challenges farmers and gardeners face and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension publications document those recommendations.
On March 1, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will welcome Cain Hickey, the state's first full-time Extension viticulturist. CAES News
40 Under 40
Since arriving at the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture in 2017, viticulture researcher Cain Hickey has helped make UGA Cooperative Extension the go-to source for wine growing expertise in the Southeast. 
Bethany Harris' UGA degrees exposed her to working with pollinators and butterflies, so her job as assistant director of education at Callaway Gardens is a perfect fit. “In addition to the butterfly center, we have an outdoor butterfly garden and my research at UGA centered around native pollinators and butterflies," she said. CAES News
Triple Dawg
Bethany Harris has found the perfect job using her entomology and horticulture education from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. As assistant director of education at Callaway Gardens, Harris truly works out in the field, overseeing the butterfly center and educational gardens, managing over 200 volunteers, and teaching workshops for the public.
Sweet potatoes are an easy-to-grow addition to Georgia gardens and they now come in more varieties than the standards like ‘Beauregard’ and ‘Georgia Jet’. ‘Bonita’, which has a light tan skin and white flesh, produces high yields of medium to large roots. ‘Murasaki’ is a purple-skinned, white-flesh variety that has a distinctive nutty flavor. “Burgundy’ has a burgundy-colored skin and deep orange flesh similar to ‘Beauregard’. CAES News
Sweet Potato History
Sweet potatoes are a traditional part of Southern holiday celebrations. A member of the morning glory family of plants, sweet potatoes are believed to have originated in Central or South America at least 5,000 years ago. Christopher Columbus brought them back to Europe on his fourth and final voyage.
Members of UGA's Tau chapter of Pi Alpha Xi Horticultural Honor Society will host their annual poinsettia sale on Dec. 7 from 8 am. to 4 p.m. at Greenhouse 13 at the UGA Riverbend Greenhouse at 111 Riverbend Road. CAES News
Poinsettia Sale
It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at UGA’s Riverbend Greenhouse Complex.
Adding mulch to landscape beds can be an effective way to control small weed infestations or in areas where herbicides cannot be used, UGA Extension experts say. CAES News
Winter Chores
Now is the time to add a blanket of mulch to perennial flowers and shrubs and divide overcrowded perennial flowers or move them to a new location, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert says.
Air Plant, Tillandsia CAES News
Plant Gift
There are plenty of options for the perfect gift when giving a plant and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has plenty of tips to make sure your gift is the right one. Whether it be a college student or a hard-to-buy-for friend, a house plant may be the perfect answer to any gift-buying predicament.
When the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech interact, especially around Thanksgiving, they’re typically colliding on the football field for another historic round of clean, old-fashioned hate. But what you see on the gridiron is 180 degrees from the relationship the two schools share in Georgia farm fields where they work in harmony — and often full-fledged partnership — to improve the productivity and profitability of various sectors of Georgia agriculture. CAES News
Rival Partners
When the University of Georgia and the Georgia Institute of Technology interact, especially around Thanksgiving, they’re typically colliding on the football field for another historic round of clean, old-fashioned hate. But what you see on the gridiron is 180 degrees from the relationship the two schools share in Georgia farm fields where they work in harmony — and often full-fledged partnership — to improve the productivity and profitability of various sectors of Georgia agriculture.