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634 results found for Horticulture
Al Pearson, a member of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Board, and his wife, Mary Pearson, established the Dr. Maurice E. “Butch” Ferree Scholarship to support students majoring in horticulture in honor of Ferree, who retired in 1998 after 24 years with UGA Extension. CAES News
Dr. Maurice E. "Butch" Ferree Scholarship
As a peach and pecan producer in central Georgia, Al Pearson relied on the expert advice provided by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. In addition to the valuable counsel provided by Extension peach expert Maurice E. “Butch” Ferree, Pearson gained something unexpected: a lifelong friend.
The camellia represents desire, passion and admiration — a wonderful choice for Valentine’s Day. CAES News
Winter Bloomers
I find it ironic that Valentine’s Day occurs in February, a time of the year when we see very few plants blooming in the landscape. In addition to cards and candy, flowers are one of the most popular gifts during this annual celebration of love. In 2018, the Society of American Florists estimated that 250 million cut roses were produced for Valentine’s Day and an estimated 35% of Americans purchased flowers.
UGA horticulture Professor Matt Chappell demonstrated proper pruning technique at a green industry event in January 2020. CAES News
Perfect Pruning
Pruning in the correct manner and at the proper time can help to maintain the size and shape of your woody shrubs, improving their appearance and appealing to the artist in every gardener.
FABricate is an entrepreneurial pitch contest hosted by the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Proposals are due Feb. 20 for the 2021 contest. CAES News
FABricate 2021
It’s not too late for University of Georgia students to turn their novel ideas into a chance at a grand prize of $10,000.
Graduate student Philip Bentz (left) and graduate student Rick Field (right) use a carbon dioxide sensor on a plant in the horticulture greenhouses. Bentz enrolled to UGA in the Integrated Plant Sciences program in 2019. (photo by Dorothy Kozlowski, taken prior to March 2020) CAES News
Integrated Plant Sciences
For students with a penchant for plants and the desire to pursue a doctoral degree, the University of Georgia offers a collaborative program that spans a variety of cutting-edge and interdisciplinary plant science disciplines.
A survey conducted by UGA researchers examined whether respondents had any concern about the growing of hemp and the creation of hemp products in their area. CAES News
Community perceptions of hemp
Hemp is a promising new industry for profitability, but growers of this newly legal crop will face a mix of public opinions according to University of Georgia research into challenges those in the hemp business may face in the southeastern United States.
A UGA student campus sustainability grant will provide funds to install regionally appropriate fruiting trees and shrubs near Lake Herrick to provide experiential learning, on-site education and long-term fruit foraging opportunities for students and visitors. CAES News
Sustainability Grants
A University of Georgia student-led project hopes to produce fruitful results with an edible landscape near Lake Herrick.
The 2021 Georgia Ag Forecast seminar will be held online at no cost starting at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Jan. 29. CAES News
2021 Ag Forecast
Economists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will discuss the effects of COVID-19 on farming, highlight agritourism impacts in the state, and give a forecast of top commodities for the next year during the annual Georgia Ag Forecast.
Blossom-end rot, which manifests in the first few weeks of growth after tomato flowers are pollinated, causes black, rotted areas on the blossom end of the fruit, opposite the stem. CAES News
Tomato Research
Home gardeners and commercial farmers alike can attest to the disappointment of seeing a beautiful tomato ripening on a vine, only to discover that the fruit has dark, sunken pits at the blossom end of the fruit. Called blossom-end rot (BER), this physiological disorder is prevalent in fruit and vegetable crops, including tomatoes, and can cause severe economic losses.