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UGA Arch from Broad Street CAES News
Presidential Interdisciplinary Seed Grants
Eleven grants totaling $1.5 million were awarded in November 2021 to recipients of the third round of Presidential Interdisciplinary Seed Grants. Overall the awards went to faculty from 13 UGA departments, centers, programs, schools and colleges.
UGA horticulture scientist Ye Juliet Chu is the latest peanut researcher in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to produce three breeding lines from peanut’s wild relatives. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Disease-Resistant Hybrids
Using proven production practices to fight disease in the field, Georgia farmers produce half the peanuts grown in the U.S. each year. Modern peanut varieties carry few genetic defenses against some of the more devastating diseases, so peanut farmers carefully consider when to plant, whether to irrigate and when to apply fungicide and insecticide to keep those diseases from infecting the plant.
bee on cone flower CAES News
Starting Seeds
It’s almost that time of year again: January is the month for seed catalogs galore. Seed catalogs are the embodiment of possibility, a chance for gardeners to envision the ever-elusive perfect garden. It is one of my favorite times in the garden year.
A spring-planted dwarf Hinoki falsecypress shows transplant shock four months after planting. CAES News
Transplant Shock
Georgia gardeners will find the most success transplanting trees in the cooler seasons. But anywhere a tree or shrub dies within the first year of planting, there is usually a root issue involved. Spring-planted trees and shrubs are generally more stressed from summer heat because their roots are still underdeveloped during the first year. This results in excessive wilting, which causes well-intentioned gardeners to literally water their plants to death. 
On the campus in Griffin, Georgia, UGA blueberry researcher Scott NeSmith typically breeds new varieties to meet growers' needs. Now, he's released some ornamental blueberries that are perfect for growing in home landscapes and will help home gardeners grow their own fresh fruit. CAES News
National Academy of Inventors
University of Georgia professors Scott NeSmith, Anumantha Kanthasamy and S. Edward Law have been elected Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. Including these three new fellows, 12 UGA faculty have received this honor, all of them since 2013.
Red poinsettias with white poinsettias in the background. CAES News
Holiday Gift Plants
As vibrant holiday plants begin to adorn the shelves of hardware stores, grocery stores and garden centers, consumers are attracted to the pinks, reds and whites atop deep green foliage, which add festive pops of color in winter homes. The appearance of plants like poinsettias and Christmas cacti usher in the holiday season and we love to fill our halls and entryways with their holiday cheer. But what about after the holidays?
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist Bob Westerfield displays several pieces of lawn and garden equipment during a class on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Winterizing Motorized Equipment
As fall temperatures cool down, much of our lawn and garden equipment begins to lay idle. Tillers, lawnmowers and weed eaters are no longer being used with the frequency they were during the warm temperatures of summer. The temptation is to just store them away until we need them later in the spring, but that could cause problems later unless the equipment is properly prepared for storage.
Tomatoes, in varying stages of ripeness, growing on a tomato plant. CAES News
Fruit or Veggie
From an early age, we’re told by our parents to make sure we eat our vegetables. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that people eat five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day. However, there’s long been confusion around what is a vegetable versus a fruit. So, when is a vegetable actually a fruit — or a root or a shoot?
The Grand Finale Award winner for the 2021 Classic City Awards is the ‘Sumati Orange’ Marigold from AmeriSeed. Judges said "Not only in fall, but all through the early spring and summer sun, these marigolds have flower power. Plants grown from seed are healthy, quickly germinating, and ready for planting in two to three weeks. Stems are tall and perfect for cut-flower production." CAES News
2021 Classic City Awards
The Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia have announced the 2021 Classic City Award winners from the hundreds of varieties tested over the long, hot summer. The Trial Gardens are known as the “go-to research trial garden to test plants for the combination of heat and humidity,” said John Ruter, director of the Trial Gardens and 2021 UGA Inventor of the Year.