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16 results found for Research and Education Centers (RECs)
Businesses are encouraged to participate in the 2022 Great Georgia Pollinator Census, set for Aug. 19-20. In 2021, Master Gardeners held a counting event at Slow Pour Brewery in Gwinnett County. CAES News
Fourth Great Georgia Pollinator Census
Partnerships with schools, businesses and educational institutions have been crucial components in the growth of the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, which was established by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in 2019.
Examples of a living mulch (top) and cereal rye cover crop terminated prior to planting (bottom). CAES News
Cover Crops, Living Mulches
For most row crop producers in Georgia, corn, cotton and peanut are planted in the spring and harvested in late fall. After harvest, the ground is left relatively bare, with the residue of the harvested crop the only organic material left on the ground. This is where cover crops come in.
Pam Knox visits a UGA weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Changing World
As climate issues capture governmental and public attention — from the effects of methane emissions to weather extremes — it is incumbent on the world to take action. Experts in UGA's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are focused on helping residents address climate challenges in ways that will benefit the environment and ensure both profitability and sustainability for industry.
From left, Blake Raulerson, Alton Standifer and Nick Place talk with CAES Ambassadors at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Georgia. (Photo by Claire Sanders) CAES News
2021 Ag Expo
Following the cancellation of 2020’s event, nearly 90,000 attendees were excited to return to Spence Field for the 2021 Sunbelt Agricultural Expo where they tested out agriculture’s newest technologies, learned about exciting research developments, and interacted with agricultural professionals from across the United States.
Wayne Hanna, best known for developing TifTuf, the strongest turfgrass ever produced at UGA, has established several endowments supporting research at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Georgia Mountain Endowment
For nearly 50 years, turfgrass researcher Wayne Hanna pursued his professional goals at the University of Georgia, first with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), then as a full professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
UGA Crop Quality Lab manager Daniel Jackson with a load of research samples from the Vidalia Onion Research Center. CAES News
Vidalia Onions
Researchers at the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories (AESL) want to make sure that the Vidalia onions you buy every year are as sweet as you expect them to be.
UGA Weather Network Director Pam Knox checks one of the data-logger boxes maintained by the network. All of the observational instruments connect to the data-logger, which collects and transmits weather data at 15-minute intervals, which is then disseminated through the UGA Weather Network website. CAES News
UGA Weather Network
On June 1, 1991, the first agricultural weather station operated by the University of Georgia began transmitting data from Griffin, Georgia. Since then, the UGA Weather Network has grown to include 87 stations scattered across the state, providing weather data to a variety of users. On June 1 this year, this 30-year record of continuous weather data makes the UGA Weather Network one of the oldest state weather networks in the country.
In the sculptured resin bee (left), females have a pointed abdomen, while the males have a blunt edge. Both males and females have a striated abdomen with raised bands. The thorax and abdomen of the carpenter bee (right) are connected, bald and smooth. CAES News
Sculptured Resin Bees
University of Georgia entomologists are seeking citizen help to document the presence of the sculptured resin bee — also known as the giant resin bee — an invasive bee that could threaten the native carpenter bee population.
From left, Josh Fuder, Ray Covington and Stephen Mihm have been UGA’s driving forces behind the creation of the Heritage Apple Orchard. (Photo by Mike Terrazas) CAES News
Heirloom Varieties
The names tick off like racehorses or colors from some fancy catalog: Carolina Red June, Duchess of Oldenburg, Hewe’s Crab and Rabun Bald, Limbertwig, Nickajack, Parks’ Pippin and many more. But these aren’t paint chips — they’re apples, hundreds of varieties that thrived in orchards across North Georgia a century ago, before an evolving apple industry swept them off shelves and tables, never to return.