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Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension weed specialist, was among the scientists who shared their findings at the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day held on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. McCullough is shown telling visitors the results of his study on bluegrass control in Bermuda grass. CAES News
Turfgrass Updates
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day, held Aug. 9 on the UGA Griffin campus, provided research-based information about the production and management of turfgrass from UGA scientists and UGA Extension specialists.
Argentine ants feeds on Terro liquid bait CAES News
Insect ID
Have you ever spotted a bug in your house and not known what it was? The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) hosts annual integrated pest management (IPM) workshops focused on the home to help pest control operators identify and manage household pests.
Bobby Goss, a FoodPIC research technician, tells the faculty about UGA chocolate research. CAES News
New Faculty Tour
New faculty at the University of Georgia learned why agriculture continues to be the state's biggest economic driver and how UGA leads the way in helping Georgians sustain and improve commodities like peanuts, poultry, pecans and turfgrass.
The Georgia Structural Pest Control Training Facility is located on the University of Georgia's campus in Griffin, Georgia. The facility was built to train and educate pest management professionals, regulatory inspectors and Cooperative Extension personnel on the biology and management of pests in the home, business and school environments. CAES News
Pests in Schools
Georgia has strict regulations and rules when it comes to managing pests at schools. The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) offers a biannual workshop on integrated pest management (IPM) for pest control operators who have school contracts in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. The program will host the fall 2018 School IPM Workshop on Thursday, Aug. 23.
A diseased leaf on a tree at the University of Georgia's Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Ga. CAES News
Turf & Ornamentals
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day is set for Thursday, Aug. 9, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. This year, two optional, interactive sessions especially designed for landscape experts will follow the field day.
University of Georgia blueberry scientist Scott NeSmith has to keep birds away from his blueberry crop so that he can research and breed new varieties for Georgia growers. His latest trick — using a dancing, inflatable tube man to scare the birds — may lead passersby to believe that the UGA Griffin campus is selling cars. CAES News
Wacky Scarecrow
Farmers have used scarecrows to keep birds away from field crops for more than 3,000 years. University of Georgia blueberry scientist Scott NeSmith uses a dancing, inflatable tube man to scare the birds away from his research plants.
Founding members of the National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture include (l-r) Suzi McCoy (Garden Media Group), Ellen Bauske (University of Georgia), Gail Langellotto (Oregon State University) Tom Bewick (USDA-NIFA), Casey Scale (American Public Gardens Association) Pam Bennett (The Ohio State University), Julie Weisenhorn (Minnesota State University) and Debbie Hamrick (North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation). CAES News
NICH Meeting
A new national initiative encourages consumers to add plants to their homes and landscapes for the health benefits plants provide.
This year 59 Young Scholars represent more than 35 high schools from across the state spent six weeks working with researchers in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Young Scholars 2018
Pipette, check. Lab coat, check. A sense of scientific curiosity, double check. It’s not your typical gear list for summer camp, but it covers just what Georgia high school students needed while they participated in this summer’s University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Young Scholars Program.
Both species of skunks found in Georgia are quite beautiful, but they are often viewed negatively due to the pungent, musky odor they can emit. This odor lingers for days and can become nauseating for some people. They also dig up lawns in search of insects and grubworms and raid backyard poultry pens and eat eggs and birds; eat garden vegetables; and damage beehives. CAES News
Skunk Control
It's the time of year when females skunks give birth. The two skunk species found in Georgia are striped skunks (polecats) and eastern spotted skunks (civet cats).