Menu

Browse Griffin Stories - Page 2

74 results found for Griffin
Researchers in the US and Senegal are studying why young people leave peanut farming behind and move to the city, an important question for the future of farming in Senegal’s Groundnut Basin. University of Georgia PhD student Pierre Diatta and Virginia Tech’s Brad Mills (far left and left), will present early findings of the study, along with UGA agricultural economist Genti Kostandini (far right), in a webinar next week. The team is working with Katim Toure, a collaborator at ENSA (École Nationale Supérieure d'Agriculture) in Senegal. CAES News
Young Senegalese Farmers
All over the world, farmers are aging and young people are moving to more urban areas for economic opportunities. Leaders wonder what factors push young people to abandon agriculture and whether technology or other tools can make farming a more attractive option for the next generation. Next week, researchers from the University of Georgia and Virginia Tech will present early findings from research exploring those questions in Senegal, where a team surveyed more than 1,000 peanut-growing households to explore challenges among peanut producers and learn the main reasons why young people turn away from agriculture.
AgDawg Kickoff Athens 81 CAES News
AgDawg Kickoff
As University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students return to campus this month, the fall tradition of AgDawg Kickoff will again welcome them with free t-shirts and dinner from a selection of food trucks at the UGA CAES Livestock Instructional Arena at 6 p.m. August 25.
Spalding County was recognized earlier this summer with a 2021 County Excellence Award from Georgia Trend magazine and the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia (ACCG) for the Healthy Life Community Garden (HLCG) project in Griffin, Georgia's Fairmont community. CAES News
Community Garden
Labeled a food desert by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Fairmont community in Griffin, Georgia, has historically had slim options for sourcing fresh, nutritious food nearby. But this desert is becoming an oasis of fresh fruits and vegetables thanks to a group of dedicated agencies and volunteers who have worked hard for nearly 10 years to create a thriving community garden.
The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will celebrate its graduates virtually on the CAES YouTube channel at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 13. Faculty, staff, students, friends and family are encouraged to tune in and cheer on the college's newest alumni in the live chat. CAES News
CAES Convocation
While plans for spring commencement at the University of Georgia will now include unlimited guests and the option for students to sit on Dooley Field at Sanford Stadium, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) will proceed with plans for a virtual Convocation ceremony for its undergraduate and graduate candidates at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 13.
Dario Chavez, associate professor of horticulture on the UGA Griffin campus, shows off the drip irrigation system in the peach orchard of the Dempsey Research Farm used to study irrigation and fertilization management for young peach trees. CAES News
Peach Irrigation
While peach orchards are a common sight throughout middle and south Georgia — helping the Peach State live up to its name — peach producers need more than just the title to ensure that both long-established groves and newly planted fields are successful.
The blue orchard mason bee or Osmia lignaria. (Photo: Scott Bauer, USDA Agriculture Research Service, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Imidacloprid Residue
New research funded by the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program and conducted at the University of Georgia shows that imidacloprid residue harms wild bees.
Price increases for sod this year could range from 2-8% over 2019 prices, according to a new survey of producers by UGA and the Georgia Urban Ag Council. CAES News
Sod Price Survey 2021
If seeing the turfgrass during the Super Bowl has you itching to unfurl sod for a new lawn, it will likely cost a bit more than usual, according to a report by the University of Georgia.
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries. CAES News
Cultivating Southern firs
During the holiday season in the U.S., more than 20 million freshly cut Christmas trees are sold every year, with fir trees topping the most-desired list. Unfortunately growers cannot meet the needs of consumers, and every year, there is a shortage of trees, primarily due to the incredible losses of susceptible firs — including balsam, Fraser, Canaan and others — to the root fungus Phytophthora.
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir. CAES News
Sustainable Gardening
Professional and home gardeners alike can grow landscapes sustainably with the help of biodegradable plant containers, but gardeners may wonder whether these containers decompose quickly enough to avoid hindering plant growth.