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222 results found for Animal and Dairy Science
Pictured is miscanthus grass used as bedding in a poultry house. CAES News
Alternative Bedding
The growing poultry industry in Georgia has farmers searching for alternative bedding options for their birds. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension poultry scientist Claudia Dunkley recommends that growers use giant miscanthus grass as bedding in their poultry houses.
To determine the quality of hay, Georgia farmers trust forage tests from the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories in Athens, Georgia. The lab provides an estimate of Relative Forage Quality (RFQ). This value is a single, easy-to-interpret number that improves a producer's understanding of forage quality and helps to establish a fair market value for the product. CAES News
Hay Testing
Hay can’t be evaluated by touch, smell, color or any other on-the-spot technique. To get a true measure of forage quality, hay has to be tested.
CAES News
Ag Hall of Fame
The Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame has two new members: former U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss and the late Thomas Richard Breedlove Sr., a pioneering northeast Georgia dairy farmer. Breedlove and Chambliss were inducted Sept. 25 as part of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Banquet and Awards Ceremony.
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. CAES News
Female farmers
Women own 13.6 percent of America’s active farms and their farms produce almost $13 billion worth of goods each year. Just like male farmers, they need access to business and technical information to help make their farms successful. But while many pride themselves on not needing a “women’s only” class on how to work the land or run a business, many other women simply feel more comfortable learning around other female farmers.
Mark McCann will take over on Oct. 1 as the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences assistant dean for Extension for agricultural and natural resources programming. CAES News
New ANR Chief
For more than 100 years, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has provided farmers, ranchers and gardeners with research-based training and on-demand information to help them improve their farms and gardens. Starting Oct. 1, a new leader will oversee these vital Extension services in Georgia.
Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black examines a pumpkin field at Jaemor Farms with farm manager Drew Echols, Rep. Terry England, UGA President Jere Morehead, CAES Dean J. Scott Angle and other officials during the UGA President's Third Annual Farm Tour. CAES News
UGA President's Farm Tour
From vineyards and vegetable patches to state-of-the-art food processing and food safety operations, agriculture in northeast Georgia is made up of a large and diverse set of enterprises.
Melony Wilson handles livestock frequently as part of her job with the University of Georgia Department of Animal and Dairy Science. She also knows how to keep herself safe while doing so. A new Georgia 4-H program will now help 4-H agents teach children across the state how to get up close and person with livestock without contracting a zoonotic disease. CAES News
Zoonotic Disease Detectives
Georgia 4-H is piloting an educational series aimed at teaching children how to help prevent the spread of animal diseases like swine flu, salmonella, E. coli and rabies.
Franklin West and Steve Stice. CAES News
Newcastle Resistant Poultry
Poultry disease is an international issue, especially when there is an outbreak close to home. However, it’s a particularly costly problem in developing countries.
Although there is no one-size-fits-all rule to rotational grazing management, to provide forage rest and recovery and improve grazing efficiency, the first step is to get cattle moving. CAES News
Water for Cattle
Just like humans, livestock are negatively impacted by poor water quality. Cattle that drink poor-quality water will drink less water and have a diminished feed intake, resulting in reduced average daily gains and return on investment.