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Browse Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden Stories - Page 2

27 results found for Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden
Known as “Euphorbia x martinii,” 'Ascot Rainbow' is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane. CAES News
Garden Royalty
Botanically speaking, ‘Ascot Rainbow’ is known as “Euphorbia x martinii.” It is native to Australia, where the name “Ascot” is associated with an old, wealthy suburb of Brisbane. In truth, it is known as a spurge, which we most often associate with a host of terrible weeds. ‘Ascot Rainbow,’ however, is worthy of garden royalty.
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape. CAES News
Fall-blooming Salvias
Salvias are deer-resistant perennials that create excitement in the garden by virtue of their spiky blooms. They also attract hummingbirds and pollinators.
While collards are really old fashioned, the application with ornamentals is new and trendy. Their monolithic blue-green leaves can serve as an amazing backdrop to pansies and snapdragons CAES News
Brassicas in Beds
The Brassicas are taking center stage! In the fall and winter seasons, we have always dabbled in flowering kale and cabbage, but it seems in the last couple of years that things are changing. The cruciferous crops are doing their part to create the wow factor in flower beds across Georgia. It’s not just flowering kale and cabbage on display, but edibles like the Toscano kale and – would you believe it – that old, Southern favorite, collards.
Ornamentals, like native azalea 'Rosy Cheeks,' perform well when planted in the fall. The key is to follow proper planting techniques. This includes digging the planting hole twice as big as the plant's rootball and breaking up the rootball before planting. CAES News
Drought & Plants
Prolonged dry weather has prompted an elevated drought response for northwest Georgia. But under all levels of drought response, new plant material can be installed under a 30-day exemption period. Once the establishment period has expired, the drought-response watering practices must be followed accordingly.
The 'Hana Jiman' camellia looks as though it were hand-painted by an artist. CAES News
Fall Camellias
Mention fall-blooming camellias and the first thought is most likely the sasanqua camellia. There are many camellia varieties and each has the ability to provide the bones or evergreen structure needed in the home landscape.
The 'Taishan Orange' marigold makes the perfect fall container plant, especially when it's combined with 'Trusty Rusty' coleus and 'Can-Can' calibrachoa. CAES News
Mari-mums
Mari-mums are large-flower marigolds, known botanically as Tagetes erecta, that are reminiscent of chrysanthemums. Many of them really look like the old-fashioned homecoming mums of the ‘50s and ‘60s, only smaller.
Zinnias are great plants for pollinators like these Gulf Fritillary butterflies.jpg CAES News
Floral Beauty
After a hurricane, you find beauty and pleasure in simple things. In my case, it is the old-fashioned zinnia. Now I say “old-fashioned” because we grew them from generic seed packets, so I don’t know the variety. I would say it is the zinnia you grew up with as a kid.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
A monarch butterfly finds the palmleaf mistflower to be a tasty treat. CAES News
Butterfly Attractor
When I moved into my new house about this time last year, I was quick to notice my neighbor’s flowers across the street. I could see drifts of wonderful, tall, blue flowers coupled with the complementary orange of swirling Gulf fritillary butterflies. I knew immediately that my neighbor was a real gardener, as those showy blooms could be identified as the native blue mistflower known botanically as Conoclinium coelestinum.