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60 results found for Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics
Field to jar series: Breeding the best peanut CAES News
Peanut Breeding
Whether they show up whole in a candy bar, are transformed into a sandwich spread or lend earthy notes to a spicy curry, peanuts are an important part of foodways in the U.S. and of cuisines from around the world. Georgia is the No. 1 peanut-producing state in the U.S., growing approximately 52% of the peanuts produced in the country in 2021, mostly in the state’s sandy Coastal Plain region.
Urtnasan "Uugii" Ganbaatar and UGA Professor Mohamed Mergoum attended the the annual Norman E. Borlaug International Symposium, sponsored by the World Food Prize Foundation. A Borlaug Fellow, Ganbaatar spent three months working with Mergoum to perform research and gain knowledge using advanced genetic technologies for wheat breeding. CAES News
Borlaug Fellow
For Borlaug Fellow Urtnasan “Uugii” Ganbaatar, the opportunity to work with University of Georgia wheat breeder and geneticist Mohamed Mergoum is opening up a world of growth. With her colleagues at the Institute of Plant and Agricultural Sciences, part of the Mongolian University of Life Sciences, Ganbaatar wants to implement the advanced breeding techniques used at UGA to improve her country's dominant crop.
The Orange Bulldog pumpkin at the UGA Bookstore. (Photo by Chamberlain Smith/UGA) CAES News
Orange Bulldog
The quest for the perfect pumpkin each fall doesn’t start at the local patch. In fact, it starts up to 10 years prior for researchers like University of Georgia plant geneticist Cecilia McGregor. McGregor leads breeding efforts in the selective pumpkin variety called the 'Orange Bulldog', following the retirement of the program’s founder, horticulturist George Boyhan.
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Plant Breeding Ph.D.s
Recent data shows that the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences produced the third-most plant-breeding Ph.D. graduates between 2015 and 2020. With over 80% of alumni employed at public or private institutions, the plant breeding, genetics and genomics Ph.D. program also ranked highly for its graduate employment rate.
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Poplar Bioproducts
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Georgia and two partner institutions have been awarded a $15.8 million grant over five years from the U.S. Department of Energy to reengineer poplar trees to be used as a sustainable energy source. The researchers will use biotechnology approaches to breed the trees as a multipurpose crop that can be used for bioenergy, biomaterial and bioproduct alternatives to petroleum-based materials.
samuele CAES News
2022-25 FFAR Fellow
Samuele Lamon, a doctoral student in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at the University of Georgia, has been selected for the 2022-25 cohort of the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research Fellows program.
Robin Buell, GRA Eminent Scholar Chair in Crop Genomics, works in a plant growth chamber. Buell received nearly $800,000 in funding to study the genome of tepary bean in an effort to address climate-related difficulties faces in production of common bean. CAES News
Bean Genes
The common bean — which includes many varieties of dry beans, from navy and black beans to red, pinto and green beans — are an important nutritional source for many world populations. However, rapidly changing climate conditions are making them increasingly difficult to grow in many locations due to high temperatures and susceptibility to diseases and pests.
UGA's Southeast Research and Education Center will host its annual field day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10. The 720-acre facility has over 60 ongoing research projects, with an emphasis on the efficient use of water. CAES News
Midville Field Day
The University of Georgia Southeast Research and Education Center will host its annual field day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10. The annual event is an open house tour of current research projects taking place at the center where College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty will highlight the work they are doing in cotton, peanuts, soybeans, corn, small grains and cover crops.
A four-leaf clover, recently found in the writer's backyard. (Photo by Aaron Hale) CAES News
Lucky Clovers
If you’ve ever scanned a field looking for a lucky four-leaf clover, then perhaps you’ve wondered why they are so rare. It turns out scientists aren’t exactly sure about the mysteries of four-leaf clovers, either.