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Browse Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics Stories

52 results found for Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics
A four-leaf clover, recently found in the writer's backyard. (Photo by Aaron Hale) CAES News
Lucky Clovers
If you’ve ever scanned a field looking for a lucky four-leaf clover, then perhaps you’ve wondered why they are so rare. It turns out scientists aren’t exactly sure about the mysteries of four-leaf clovers, either.
Robin Buell2 1536x1025 CAES News
Plant Genomics Research
Since Robin Buell joined the University of Georgia faculty in fall 2021, there’s been a flurry of activity in her lab. Buell and her researchers have nine projects underway in plant genomics – and Buell has already secured millions of dollars in federal funding.
How sweet it is to be a Georgia-grown satsuma orange! (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
Seedless Citrus
Wayne Hanna, a legend in the plant breeding world, specifically with turfgrass, retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2002. He immediately joined the faculty at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus. When he arrived, he asked the assistant dean if he could work on developing a cold-tolerant citrus tree that produced seedless fruit. “Go ahead” was the answer.
The Grand Finale Award winner for the 2021 Classic City Awards is the ‘Sumati Orange’ Marigold from AmeriSeed. Judges said "Not only in fall, but all through the early spring and summer sun, these marigolds have flower power. Plants grown from seed are healthy, quickly germinating, and ready for planting in two to three weeks. Stems are tall and perfect for cut-flower production." CAES News
2021 Classic City Awards
The Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia have announced the 2021 Classic City Award winners from the hundreds of varieties tested over the long, hot summer. The Trial Gardens are known as the “go-to research trial garden to test plants for the combination of heat and humidity,” said John Ruter, director of the Trial Gardens and 2021 UGA Inventor of the Year.
Wayne Hanna and Brian Schwartz CAES News
Home Turf
When the University of Georgia Bulldogs take the field against the University of Florida Gators for their annual football rivalry on Saturday, the teams will be playing in neutral territory at TIAA Bank Field in Jacksonville, Florida. But the grass they are playing on could be considered home turf for the Dawgs.
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Pumpkin Breeding
The quest for the perfect pumpkin each fall doesn’t start at the local patch. In fact, it starts up to 10 years prior for researchers like University of Georgia plant geneticist Cecilia McGregor. McGregor leads breeding efforts in the selective pumpkin variety called the ‘Orange Bulldog’, following the retirement of the program’s founder, horticulturist George Boyhan.
Professor David Bertioli and his wife, Soraya Leal-Bertioli, senior research scientist, work together with peanut plants in their greenhouses at the Center for Applied Genetic Technologies. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Wild Peanut Genes
A decade ago, University of Georgia plant scientists David and Soraya Bertioli were living and working in Brazil when they began to wonder about peanut plants they encountered in different corners of the world with an astounding ability to withstand fungal diseases without the use of fungicides. The Bertiolis wondered if these different plants might all have something in common. Did they owe their natural resistance to a single genetic source?
CAES FFAR Fellow Shreena Pradhan and Sujan Paudel CAES News
FFAR Fellows
Two doctoral candidates in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at University of Georgia have been selected for the 2021 class of the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) Fellows program.
Hemp is the same species as marijuana (Cannabis sativa), and the only difference is a legal one: Plants with less than 0.3% of the chemical that gives users a “high”— tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — are hemp, and anything over 0.3% THC is marijuana. CAES News
Hemp Genetics
When you buy something at the store, you have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting no matter where you buy it — a Coke is a Coke, Oreos are Oreos — and whether you buy them in Atlanta or Seattle doesn’t really change what you get. Farmers are in a similar position when they choose what to plant, but in the burgeoning field of industrial hemp, it turns out that things are much more complicated.