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Browse Plant Pathology Stories - Page 14

228 results found for Plant Pathology
Here is a picture of a  peach tree orchard. CAES News
Peach Pest Management
University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen is concerned that Georgia peach growers can’t tell the difference between phony peach disease and weevil or nematode damage. A consequence could be that farmers unnecessarily destroy trees and potential fruit.
Pictured are three blackberry leaves that have Blackberry Yellow Vein Virus. CAES News
Blackberry Viruses
With no chemical treatments to kill viruses in blackberries, University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen recommends Georgia producers grow tissue-cultured plants.
The 2016 Ag Forecast sessions will be held on Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Carroll County Ag Center in Carrollton; Friday, Jan. 22, at Unicoi State Park in Cleveland; Monday, Jan. 25, at the Cloud Livestock Facility in Bainbridge; Tuesday, Jan. 26, at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton; Wednesday, Jan. 27, at the Blueberry Warehouse in Alma; and Friday, Jan. 29, at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building in Macon. CAES News
Jan. 22 Ag Forecast Canceled
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Georgia Ag Forecast seminar at Unicoi State Park has been canceled due to potentially hazardous winter weather in White County and north Georgia.
University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean and Director Sam Pardue - January 2016 CAES News
New Dean Named
Samuel Pardue, a noted poultry science researcher and administrator at North Carolina State University, has been named dean and director of the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013. CAES News
Warm Winter Blues
After ending 2015 with some record-breaking warm and wet weather, Georgia’s fruit and tree nut farmers are concerned that the lack of chill hours and soggy soil could damage their crops.
UGA peanut geneticist Peggy Ozias-Akins, director of the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, examines a peanut blossom. Ozias-Akin's lab on the UGA Tifton Campus focuses on female reproduction and gene transfer in plants. CAES News
Women's Leadership Fellows
A member of the University of Georgia’s inaugural class of the Women’s Leadership Fellows Program, Peggy Ozias-Akins is more focused on learning from colleagues than imparting words of wisdom.
CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture 2015
The key to feeding the world’s growing population this century will be to empower the 2.5 billion people, worldwide, who depend on small farms for their food and livelihood. That answer comes from Sanjaya Rajaram, winner of the 2014 World Food Prize, who spoke to University of Georgia community members gathered at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences' annual D.W. Brooks Lecture on Nov. 10.
Walter Ondicho Moturi, Emmanuellah Lekete, Marina Aferiba Tandoh and Yamin Kabir are studying in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and College of Family and Consumer Sciences as part of the Borlaug Higher Education for Agricultural Research and Development fellowship program. CAES News
BHEARD Fellows
Norman Borlaug,1970 Nobel Peace Prize laureate and one of the leaders the Green Revolution dedicated his career to help ending food scarcity around the world. This fall four agricultural scientists from Africa and Asia are taking up that mantle and continuing his work as part of the Borlaug Higher Education for Agricultural Research and Development (BHEARD) Program at the University of Georgia.
Mushrooms typically pop up after a period of rainfall. University of Georgia plant pathologists say identifying the ones that are edible is hard, even for trained experts. Eating a poisonous mushrooms can lead to intestinal discomfort, cause damage to vital organs and even lead to death. CAES News
Toxic Mushrooms
To give an accurate identification of a mushroom, University of Georgia plant pathologist Jean Williams-Woodward needs to examine a sample in her laboratory. Identifying mushrooms is not an easy task, and incorrectly identifying one can lead to deadly results.