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Browse Plant Pathology Stories - Page 18

228 results found for Plant Pathology
Wasp eggs travel on a hornworm that has been parasitized by the wasp and is now used as a host for the wasp's eggs. This is an example of a beneficial insect, the wasp, being used to control a tomato pest in a vegetable garden. CAES News
IPM Workshop
A workshop for small-scale vegetable farmers and home gardeners interested in using integrated pest management techniques is set for Friday, Sept. 19 on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin.
This is a file photo of a center pivot irrigation system being used. CAES News
Georgia Drought
A summer drought combined with scorching temperatures have Georgia farmers feeling the heat, says University of Georgia’s agricultural climatologist Pam Knox.
CAES News
Corn Prices
Potential record-setting corn yields have contributed to a bleak market for Georgia farmers, says University of Georgia agricultural economist, Nathan Smith. Smith also believes next year’s price will be worse than this year’s.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Field Day
University of Georgia cotton and peanut research will be on display at an annual field day in Tifton next month.
cracked pecans CAES News
Pecan Field Day
The Southeast Georgia Pecan Field Day has been set for Aug. 27 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Parker Brothers Farm in Baxley. Sponsored by University of Georgia Extension, the field day is planned specifically for the growing number of pecan growers in the southeastern region of Georgia.
Southern corn rust appeared at least two weeks early in 2014 (5 June) than it did in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013. Appearing earlier means that this disease will likely be more problematic than in recent years. Corn that is approaching (or has passed) the tassel growth stage is worth protecting if the yield potential is there, according to UGA Extension agent Shane Curry. CAES News
Southern Corn Rust
Southern corn rust struck Georgia's corn crop two weeks earlier this season and has spread across the Coastal Plain, says a University of Georgia plant pathologist. If not treated quickly, the annual disease can stunt plants and reduce yields.
Pictured is an onion plant infected with yellow bud disease. CAES News
Yellow Bud Disease
Georgia is the only state that produces sweet Vidalia onions. It’s also the only state where onion farmers are tackling a new disease — yellow bud.
Alex Csinos, a University of Georgia scientist based in Tifton, holds up a pair of tobacco plants during a tobacco tour on the UGA Tifton Campus on June 10, 2014. Csinos shows nematode damage on a tobacco plant. CAES News
Nematodes On Tobacco
Microscopic worms called nematodes may seem harmless, but they can devastate a tobacco field, reducing yields, stunting plant growth and cutting into farmer profits. A University of Georgia plant pathologist is studying different management systems in hopes of reducing the nematode’s impact on Georgia agriculture.
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Better, Healthier Cotton
Breeding cotton varieties with resistance to root-knot nematodes and better cotton fiber quality are at the forefront of Peng Chee’s research at the University of Georgia.