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228 results found for Plant Pathology
Pictured is a tobacco field in Coffee County that was affected by black shank disease. CAES News
Black Shank Disease
April showers washed away chemical treatments and provided moisture for infections in 2014, causing Georgia farmers to lose between 4 and 5 percent of the state’s 12,000-plus tobacco acres to black shank disease.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Peanut Farm Show
The University of Georgia Tifton Campus will become the center for all things peanut for growers and industry personnel on Thursday, Jan. 15, when the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center hosts the annual Georgia Peanut Farm Show.
Nighttime spraying is recommended by UGA plant pathologists in treating peanuts for white mold disease. CAES News
Nighttime/Early Morning Spraying
A University of Georgia plant pathologist is advocating nighttime and early morning fungicide application as an option to combat white mold disease, a perennially devastating disease for Georgia peanut farmers.
Lettuce, a high-value cash crop, was among the highest yielding crops in a University of Georgia organic trial incorporating cover crops into a high-intensive crop rotation model at a UGA farm in Watkinsville, GA. The crop yielded a net return of over $9,000 per acre over the three-year study period. CAES News
Cover crops + organics
Organic vegetable farmers in the Southeast now have a successful model for planting summer cover crops with high-value, cool-season crops, thanks to a University of Georgia study. The two models use a series of crop rotations to increase yields, control insects and diseases, improve crop quality and build soil biomass.
Dave Hoisington, right, director of the UGA-led Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Peanut and Mycotoxin, and Jamie Rhoads, incoming assistant director, check out peanuts in a field in Tierra Muscady, Haiti. CAES News
International Outreach
The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)’s University of Georgia-housed Peanut & Mycotoxin Innovation Lab (PMIL) is helping to create Extension materials that will be used internationally to curb mycotoxin exposure among smallholder farmers.
Pictured is a pecan affected by scab disease. CAES News
Pecan Scab Resistance
A major disease plaguing Georgia’s pecan crop, scab is a growing problem for state producers due to increasing resistance to the fungicides used to control the disease.
Scientists from China and Taiwan visit with CAES researchers at the 2011 Ag Expo in Moultrie. CAES News
Asian Agricultural Sciences Summit
From tilapia to canned Mandarin oranges, Americans import many staple grocery products from Asian nations like China, Taiwan and Japan. Likewise, these countries import Georgia-grown products—chicken, cotton and pecans.
Georgia agricultural leaders took part in a groundbreaking in July at the Sunbelt Expo in Moultrie. The groundbreaking was for the new Spotlight State building, which will be constructed in time for the Expo, to be held Oct. 14-16. Participating in the groundbreaking are (from left): Georgia Agricultural Commissioner Gary Black, Georgia Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Scott Angle, Sunbelt Executive Director Chip Blalock, assistant director of the Georgia Development Authority Donald Wilder, professor of horticulture at Fort Valley State, James E. Brown, Brittany Beasley (representing Colombo North America) and ABAC President David Bridges. CAES News
Sunbelt Expo
Georgia will definitely be on the minds of the estimated 90,000 people that will flock to this year’s Sunbelt Ag Expo in October.
Sugar beets are being researched at UGA as a possible alternative feed source for dairy cattle. CAES News
Sugar Beets
Georgia dairymen may soon have an alternative feed source for their cattle.