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Browse Plant Pathology Stories - Page 11

223 results found for Plant Pathology
Michelle Momany, professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, and Marin Brewer, associate professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Plant Pathology, recently received a $197,798 contract from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study antifungal resistance in agricultural settings. Their study will focus on Aspergillus fungi, which can cause crop loss and dangerous lung infections in those with compromised immune systems. CAES News
Fungicide Resistance
There are a limited number of compounds available to combat fungal infections in both plants and people. A team of University of Georgia researchers is helping to assess the risk posed by fungi developing widespread resistance to the stable of antifungal compounds used in the United States.
The bean plataspid or kudzu bug CAES News
Exotic Pest Meeting
The Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council will examine the control and management of invasive insects and plants at the council’s annual conference on Monday, Oct. 30, at the University of Georgia Griffin campus. The conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Local officials, regents and University of Georgia President Jere Morehead pose for a photo at the ribbon cutting of the new Turfgrass Research Building on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Turf Team
University of Georgia, state and industry leaders cut the ribbon on Sept. 21 signifying the official openings of three new turfgrass research and education facilities on the Griffin, Tifton and Athens campuses. The largest of the facilities is on the UGA Griffin campus, where the ceremony took place.
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Think Ahead
Georgia’s hot, muggy summers provide the perfect conditions for diseases to thrive in. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little says the secret to fighting diseases in homegrown vegetables is to stay a few steps ahead of them.
Twenty-one CAES graduate students hit the road in May to explore crop protection career opportunities in Florida. CAES News
Crop Protection Careers
The search for a perfect job can feel like a major quest. That quest turns literal for a group of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students for one week each summer.
A yellow squash matures on the vine of a squash plant growing in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Squash Struggles
Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen conducted trials on 11 varieties of winter squash at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops. Matteen tested winter squash varieties 'Waltham' butternut, 'Zeppelin' delicata, 'Metro PMR' butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, 'Thai Kang Kob' tropical pumpkin, 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of 'Waltham' butternut and Seminole pumpkin. He found that the two sweet potato squashes and Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases. CAES News
Winter Squash
By determining the varieties best suited for the area, University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash. He has found that Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins, as well as Choctaw and 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato squashes, hold up best against squash pests and diseases.
Based on the UGA Tifton Campus, Ron Gitaitis researches bacterial diseases on Vidalia onions, and he was the first scientist to discover three species of onion bacteria. He has published numerous reports and journal articles, and has mentored scientists at UGA and other institutions throughout his career. Many of his discoveries shaped production practices in the Vidalia region. CAES News
Onion HOF
Ron Gitaitis, a plant pathologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, was inducted into the Vidalia Onion Hall of Fame by the Vidalia Onion Committee at the committee’s annual awards banquet, held on Feb. 4 at the Vidalia Community Center in Vidalia, Georgia.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.