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University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist Bob Westerfield displays several pieces of lawn and garden equipment during a class on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Winterizing Motorized Equipment
As fall temperatures cool down, much of our lawn and garden equipment begins to lay idle. Tillers, lawnmowers and weed eaters are no longer being used with the frequency they were during the warm temperatures of summer. The temptation is to just store them away until we need them later in the spring, but that could cause problems later unless the equipment is properly prepared for storage.
Tomatoes, in varying stages of ripeness, growing on a tomato plant. CAES News
Fruit or Veggie
From an early age, we’re told by our parents to make sure we eat our vegetables. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that people eat five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day. However, there’s long been confusion around what is a vegetable versus a fruit. So, when is a vegetable actually a fruit — or a root or a shoot?
The Grand Finale Award winner for the 2021 Classic City Awards is the ‘Sumati Orange’ Marigold from AmeriSeed. Judges said "Not only in fall, but all through the early spring and summer sun, these marigolds have flower power. Plants grown from seed are healthy, quickly germinating, and ready for planting in two to three weeks. Stems are tall and perfect for cut-flower production." CAES News
2021 Classic City Awards
The Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia have announced the 2021 Classic City Award winners from the hundreds of varieties tested over the long, hot summer. The Trial Gardens are known as the “go-to research trial garden to test plants for the combination of heat and humidity,” said John Ruter, director of the Trial Gardens and 2021 UGA Inventor of the Year.
UGArden Club members had the opportunity to harvest the vineyard’s Old World grapes. CAES News
Crushing It
Last month, UGArden Club members camped out at Shooting Creek Vines in western North Carolina, harvesting and processing wine grapes over the course of a weekend.
“Anytime we leave the farm, we come back inspired by places we have visited and that gives us ideas on how we can do things differently or better than we were doing,” said Mandy O’Shea, UGA horticulture alum and co-owner of 3 Porch Farm in Comer, Georgia. CAES News
3 Porch Farm
Principles before profit has been 3 Porch Farm’s business model from the beginning. When the farm was just a dream, Steve and Mandy O’Shea — owners and operators of 3 Porch Farm — knew that they wanted to use their business to do as much good as possible. And now, with more than 10 years of farming under their belts, the couple’s commitment to sustainability is evident in everything they do on the farm.
In the spring, crape myrtles add color with flowers. In the fall, they add color with brightly colored leaves. CAES News
Crape Myrtle Care
Southern gardeners love crape myrtles, but many don’t know how to care for them to realize the full, gorgeous blooms they expect in the summer.
leafcutter bee on mountain mint (1) CAES News
Pollinator Prep
Pollinator conservation does not stop when the weather turns cool. There are a few items you can add to your pollinator to-do list for the fall and early winter to help pollinators next spring.
food waste (1) CAES News
Fighting Food Waste
Agricultural producers around the world are constantly faced with risks to their crops from disease, weather and pests, but even more losses occur after crops are harvested. In fact, nearly a third of all the food produced worldwide — approximately 1.3 billion tons — is lost to food wastage each year.
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Pumpkin Breeding
The quest for the perfect pumpkin each fall doesn’t start at the local patch. In fact, it starts up to 10 years prior for researchers like University of Georgia plant geneticist Cecilia McGregor. McGregor leads breeding efforts in the selective pumpkin variety called the ‘Orange Bulldog’, following the retirement of the program’s founder, horticulturist George Boyhan.