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The CAES Alumni Association will present the 2018 awards at a banquet on November 9 at the Grand Hall in Tate Student Center. CAES News
Alumni Awards
Agricultural advocates and educators topped this year’s list of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association’s best and brightest alumni.
David Okello, the head of the groundnut improvement program for Uganda’s National Agricultural Research Organisation (far left) hosted colleagues from other East African nations who are working to streamline their groundnut breeding programs through a breeding management software program and the Peanut Innovation Lab. Project participants include (from left): Justus Chintu of the Department of Agricultural Research Services in Malawi; Amade Muitia from the Mozambique Agricultural Research Institute (IIAM); Tonike Malema from Zambia; Mary Jacinta de Carvalho from Mozambique; Lutangu Makweti of the Zambia Agricultural Research Institute; Owiny Ronald  from Uganda; and Sinkala Willard from Zambia. Photo by David Okello CAES News
Breeding Peanut Varieties
Groundnut producers face challenges in the field, from unpredictable rainfall to acidic soils to a particularly difficult menace, groundnut rosette disease. These types of challenges are the reason that plant breeders systematically create new varieties, targeting the genetic traits that carry resistance or improve yield. A project funded by the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut is equipping plant breeders from across East and Southern Africa with innovative software to make that work quicker and more efficient.
University of Georgia employees Eddie Edenfield (r) and Dennis Evans check readings at the UGA weather station on the campus in Griffin, Georgia. Eddenfield and Evans are responsible for making sure each of the network's 86 stations operate properly. CAES News
Life-Saving Data
The University of Georgia’s 86 weather stations record data 24 hours a day, seven days a week across Georgia. Farmers use this data to help them determine when to plant and treat their crops. During Hurricane Michael, the system helped the National Weather Service to track the storm and save lives.
On October 10, 2018, intense winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
Cotton Crop
University of Georgia agricultural economists believe that Georgia cotton farmers in the path of Hurricane Michael have only begun to feel the impact of the storm that took 90 or 100 percent of many area growers’ crops.
Author and international development expert Robert Paarlberg will deliver the 2018 University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences annual D.W. Brooks Lecture at theCenter for Continuing Education at 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 8. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture and Awards
Author and international development expert Robert Paarlberg has spent years dismantling the oversimplified narratives surrounding global hunger and its remedies.
Peanut harvest will be delayed this year because of Hurricane Michael and the damage to buying points and shellers in South Georgia. CAES News
Georgia Peanut Crop
Georgia peanut farmers, still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Michael on October 10-11, are facing uncertainty about when and where to unload their crop after harvest, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort.
High winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
Georgia Cotton Crop
What was an extremely promising Georgia cotton crop was devastated when Hurricane Michael ravaged south Georgia Oct. 10-11. According to Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist, the prospects of 1,500 to 1,800 pounds of dryland cotton for some producers were reduced, resulting in 80 to 90 percent losses in some fields.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
Emergency Water
Most Americans take for granted having fresh, clean water to drink, but that valuable resource isn’t guaranteed during times of emergency. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert Gary Hawkins says, no matter whether your drinking water comes from a private well or a municipal source, having an emergency supply of water is something everyone should have.
CAES News
Food Evolution?
From food labels to classroom debates, the public discussion around genetically modified crops and food is everywhere — but never with much depth.