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Browse Crop and Soil Sciences Stories - Page 27

714 results found for Crop and Soil Sciences
CAES Office of Global Programs Associate Director Vicki McMaken, CAES doctoral candidate Davis Musia Gimode and CAES undergraduate Sara Reeves attended this year’s World Food Prize symposium in Des Moines, Iowa. CAES News
World Food Prize
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) spend a lot of class time discussing ways to end food insecurity, but there are many lessons that can’t be learned in the classroom.
University of Georgi Crop and Soil Sciences Professor Wayne Parrott and Assistant Professor Jason Wallace are working with the carnivorous water plant bladderwort in hopes that its unique genetic structure can shed some light on ways to reduce crosstalk between new genes during advanced plant breeding. CAES News
Bladderwort Research
With the advent of CRISPR technologies and other precise genome editing methods, it has become faster and easier for crop scientists to breed new varieties. But there are still a few technical roadblocks that need to be overcome.
Peanuts being picked on the UGA Tifton campus on October 31, 2018. CAES News
Peanut Crop
Three separate weather events this season will likely impact the quality and yield of a substantial amount of Georgia’s peanut acreage, according to Scott Monfort, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan agronomist.
Tall Fescue Plant CAES News
Fescue Fungus
While many people know that the microbes in our guts are an important part of our health, many are unaware that microbes are just as important to our crops.
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue to control Palmer amaranth even after their corn is harvested. CAES News
Palmer Amaranth Management
Georgia farmers scored what many view as a significant victory when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency extended the registration of the controversial weed killer dicamba for two years. The herbicide can be used for over-the-top weed control in cotton and soybean fields, according to Stanley Culpepper, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist.
The CAES Alumni Association will present the 2018 awards at a banquet on November 9 at the Grand Hall in Tate Student Center. CAES News
Alumni Awards
Agricultural advocates and educators topped this year’s list of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association’s best and brightest alumni.
David Okello, the head of the groundnut improvement program for Uganda’s National Agricultural Research Organisation (far left) hosted colleagues from other East African nations who are working to streamline their groundnut breeding programs through a breeding management software program and the Peanut Innovation Lab. Project participants include (from left): Justus Chintu of the Department of Agricultural Research Services in Malawi; Amade Muitia from the Mozambique Agricultural Research Institute (IIAM); Tonike Malema from Zambia; Mary Jacinta de Carvalho from Mozambique; Lutangu Makweti of the Zambia Agricultural Research Institute; Owiny Ronald  from Uganda; and Sinkala Willard from Zambia. Photo by David Okello CAES News
Breeding Peanut Varieties
Groundnut producers face challenges in the field, from unpredictable rainfall to acidic soils to a particularly difficult menace, groundnut rosette disease. These types of challenges are the reason that plant breeders systematically create new varieties, targeting the genetic traits that carry resistance or improve yield. A project funded by the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut is equipping plant breeders from across East and Southern Africa with innovative software to make that work quicker and more efficient.
University of Georgia employees Eddie Edenfield (r) and Dennis Evans check readings at the UGA weather station on the campus in Griffin, Georgia. Eddenfield and Evans are responsible for making sure each of the network's 86 stations operate properly. CAES News
Life-Saving Data
The University of Georgia’s 86 weather stations record data 24 hours a day, seven days a week across Georgia. Farmers use this data to help them determine when to plant and treat their crops. During Hurricane Michael, the system helped the National Weather Service to track the storm and save lives.
On October 10, 2018, intense winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
Cotton Crop
University of Georgia agricultural economists believe that Georgia cotton farmers in the path of Hurricane Michael have only begun to feel the impact of the storm that took 90 or 100 percent of many area growers’ crops.