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UGA's Wes Porter is an expert in precision agriculture. He is located on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Precision Ag Award
A University of Georgia scientist’s dedication to educating Georgia farmers about the benefits of precision agriculture has garnered him international recognition. Wes Porter, a UGA Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist, will receive the Educator/Researcher Award from the PrecisionAg Institute at the InfoAg Conference in St. Louis, Missouri, on Tuesday, July 23.
Founded in 1222, UNIPD — now home to UGA's dual master's degree program in sustainable agriculture — is considered the fifth-oldest university in the world. Located about 25 miles from Venice in northern Italy's Veneto region, the city of Padova is much older. Padova traces its roots to 1183 B.C. In addition to scores of notable faculty and alumni – Galileo Galilei taught mathematics at UNIPD for 17 years, and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and Andrea Vesalio, the founder of modern anatomy, both studied there – the world's oldest botanical garden, established in 1545, is also located at the university. CAES News
Collaborative Research
A dual degree master’s program that evolved from a partnership between the University of Georgia and the University of Padova in Padua, Italy, has also led to collaborative research between the two institutions.
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties. CAES News
CSSA Fellow
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA).
Nostoc is a jelly-like substance with multiple common names like star jelly and witch’s butter. In its hydrated, gelatinous, green state, it can be a safety hazard. Slippery when wet, Nostoc dries into a black crust that can prevent stolons from rooting, or “tacking,” into the soil, delaying the growth and spread of turfgrass. CAES News
Nostoc Algae
Recent dry weather encouraged the use, and possible overuse, of irrigation systems. Followed by tropical conditions characterized by heavy rainfall and humidity, there have been reports of a jelly-like substance growing in turf.
Two women tour the organic production plots at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm during UGA's 2014 Organic Twilight Tour. CAES News
Farm Tours
The University of Georgia is a hub for research that will shape farms tomorrow, and northeast Georgians will get a sneak peek at the future of farming at two farm tour open houses this month.
Samuele Lamon and Aaron Bruce were the two most recent graduates of the dual master’s degree program between UGA and the University of Padova. They are pictured with Gurpreet Virk at the UGA-Tifton spring graduation ceremony on May 4, 2019. CAES News
Dual Degrees
American and international students continue to be attracted to the dual master’s degree program in sustainable agriculture offered through a partnership between the University of Georgia Department of Crop and Soil Sciences (CRSS) and the University of Padova (UNIPD) Department of Agronomy, Food, Natural Resources, Animals and Environment (DAFNAE) in Italy.
Georgia sod producers are scrambling to provide more zoysia this season. The popularity of the grass coupled with the wet growing season has their supplies running low. UGA turfgrass researchers Paul Raymer (left) and Alfredo Martinez (right) are shown inspecting a roll of sod with retired UGA Extension turfgrass specialist Gil Landry. CAES News
Zoysia Shortage
Zoysiagrass is gaining in popularity throughout Georgia. Couple increased popularity with a wet and overcast 2018 growing season and some Georgia sod producers are seeing a decline in their inventory.
Downforce is a planter setting that helps farmers plant seeds at the appropriate soil depth. CAES News
April Climate
Farmers in the southern half of Georgia benefited from drier conditions this April, while producers in the soggy northern half of the state are still working to prepare fields for spring planting.
A push mower used to mow turfgrass. CAES News
Green Up
While many warm-season turfgrass species have shown signs of significant green-up, some grasses and locations still have an appearance of being dormant or slowly transitioning.