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Browse Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture Stories - Page 2

35 results found for Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture
bee on cone flower CAES News
Starting Seeds
It’s almost that time of year again: January is the month for seed catalogs galore. Seed catalogs are the embodiment of possibility, a chance for gardeners to envision the ever-elusive perfect garden. It is one of my favorite times in the garden year.
Christmas tree close-up CAES News
Christmas Tree Recycling
If you celebrate Christmas, there is nothing like having a real tree to decorate in your home for the holidays. The festive aroma alone provides such a sense of nostalgia. But once the holidays have quickly come and gone, the next order of business is disposing of your tree.
A spring-planted dwarf Hinoki falsecypress shows transplant shock four months after planting. CAES News
Transplant Shock
Georgia gardeners will find the most success transplanting trees in the cooler seasons. But anywhere a tree or shrub dies within the first year of planting, there is usually a root issue involved. Spring-planted trees and shrubs are generally more stressed from summer heat because their roots are still underdeveloped during the first year. This results in excessive wilting, which causes well-intentioned gardeners to literally water their plants to death. 
“Slugs, by their very nature, must have moisture to survive and are known to eat damp paper on occasion,” said Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Paul Pugliese. “The moral of the story: We now know why the postal delivery service is called 'snail mail.'” CAES News
Snail Mail
Recently, a church trustee in Bartow County brought samples of “holey” mail to the local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office for closer examination. Strangely, mail deposited in the church’s mailbox was showing up with holes chewed through the outer layer of the envelopes, but the mail inside was intact — a small miracle in itself.
leafcutter bee on mountain mint (1) CAES News
Pollinator Prep
Pollinator conservation does not stop when the weather turns cool. There are a few items you can add to your pollinator to-do list for the fall and early winter to help pollinators next spring.
John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org CAES News
Tree Sex
Female flowers and female trees produce fruit and seeds. Male flowers and trees produce pollen. Making the correct choice of tree gender can be important. Anyone who has ever smelled putrid ginkgo fruit, washed mulberries off their car or sneezed at tree pollen should understand.
The fruit husks contain the highest concentration of juglone on the tree. (Photo by Franklin Bonner, USFS, ret., Bugwood.org) CAES News
Killer Tree
When you look into your garden or backyard, be careful not to ignore your black walnut (Juglans nigra) tree. Lurking inside its leaves, fruits and roots is a pesticide made to control competition.
Often planted to create borders or buffers, Leyland cypress trees can grow four feet taller in just a year. Planting too close together or too close to structures can present a huge problem as the tree matures. CAES News
Leland Cypress
Leyland cypress are one of the most commonly planted landscape trees, but poor site selection and disease pressure may soon send them the way of red tips and Bradford pears.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Nick Place participated in the Great Georgia Pollinator Census while visiting the Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center. CAES News
Pollinator Census
Thousands of Georgians came together on August 20 and 21 to count pollinator insects in their local gardens for the third annual Great Georgia Pollinator Census.