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Browse Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture Stories

23 results found for Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture
“Slugs, by their very nature, must have moisture to survive and are known to eat damp paper on occasion,” said Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent Paul Pugliese. “The moral of the story: We now know why the postal delivery service is called 'snail mail.'” CAES News
Snail Mail
Recently, a church trustee in Bartow County brought samples of “holey” mail to the local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office for closer examination. Strangely, mail deposited in the church’s mailbox was showing up with holes chewed through the outer layer of the envelopes, but the mail inside was intact — a small miracle in itself.
leafcutter bee on mountain mint (1) CAES News
Pollinator Prep
Pollinator conservation does not stop when the weather turns cool. There are a few items you can add to your pollinator to-do list for the fall and early winter to help pollinators next spring.
John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org CAES News
Tree Sex
Female flowers and female trees produce fruit and seeds. Male flowers and trees produce pollen. Making the correct choice of tree gender can be important. Anyone who has ever smelled putrid ginkgo fruit, washed mulberries off their car or sneezed at tree pollen should understand.
The fruit husks contain the highest concentration of juglone on the tree. (Photo by Franklin Bonner, USFS, ret., Bugwood.org) CAES News
Killer Tree
When you look into your garden or backyard, be careful not to ignore your black walnut (Juglans nigra) tree. Lurking inside its leaves, fruits and roots is a pesticide made to control competition.
Often planted to create borders or buffers, Leyland cypress trees can grow four feet taller in just a year. Planting too close together or too close to structures can present a huge problem as the tree matures. CAES News
Leland Cypress
Leyland cypress are one of the most commonly planted landscape trees, but poor site selection and disease pressure may soon send them the way of red tips and Bradford pears.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Nick Place participated in the Great Georgia Pollinator Census while visiting the Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center. CAES News
Pollinator Census
Thousands of Georgians came together on August 20 and 21 to count pollinator insects in their local gardens for the third annual Great Georgia Pollinator Census. 
Spalding County was recognized earlier this summer with a 2021 County Excellence Award from Georgia Trend magazine and the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia (ACCG) for the Healthy Life Community Garden (HLCG) project in Griffin, Georgia's Fairmont community. CAES News
Community Garden
Labeled a food desert by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Fairmont community in Griffin, Georgia, has historically had slim options for sourcing fresh, nutritious food nearby. But this desert is becoming an oasis of fresh fruits and vegetables thanks to a group of dedicated agencies and volunteers who have worked hard for nearly 10 years to create a thriving community garden.
UGA Cooperative Extension volunteers contribute thousands of hours of their time and effort to support youth, family and agricultural programming throughout the state every year. CAES News
Volunteer Power
Even in the midst of a global pandemic, volunteers have continued to make a positive impact for Georgians of all ages. Throughout Volunteer Appreciation Week April 19 - 23, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is honoring thousands of volunteers who have dedicated their time to facilitate 4-H, Master Gardener and Family and Consumer Sciences programming on the county, district and state levels.
Pink Lady apples hang from a tree at the University of Georgia - Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Arbor Day
Nationally, Americans recognize Arbor Day in April. However, Georgia celebrates Arbor Day on the third Friday of February each year because this is a better time to plant trees, giving roots time to grow before the heat and drought of our summer months.