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UGA Crop Quality Lab manager Daniel Jackson with a load of research samples from the Vidalia Onion Research Center. CAES News
Vidalia Onions
Researchers at the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories (AESL) want to make sure that the Vidalia onions you buy every year are as sweet as you expect them to be.
University of Georgia horticulture assistant Makenzie English seems overwhelmed by the proliferation of zucchini and summer squash from the summer garden. CAES News
Oh My Squash
A national recognition day for giving away squash? Have you ever heard of such a thing?
Jennifer Thompson (left), associate research scientist in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Tim Griffeth (green shirt), an agriculture teacher at North Oconee High School, are among those working in UGArden. CAES News
Grow It Know It
As a kindergarten teacher, Robin Edens was an outlier in the group of mostly middle and high school teachers at the University of Georgia learning how to introduce food-based learning to their students.
Coreopsis is a genus of flowering plants that has both annual and perennial members, 18 of which are found in Georgia. They range in habitat from sunny and dry to sunny and swampy, and can be found throughout the state. CAES News
Native Plants
August 3 is National Georgia Day, and University of Georgia horticulture professor Bodie Pennisi wants the state’s gardeners to learn more about the native plants that make up Georgia’s landscapes.
Poultry Science Professor Jeanna Wilson (right) works with Denise Backus, a guidance counselor from East Jackson Comprehensive High School, during an Avian Academy session. CAES News
Avian Academy
Agriculture and science educators from around the state participated in the University of Georgia's 2021 Avian Academy program to learn about the state's No. 1 industry through hands-on labs led by teaching faculty in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Species used to develop interspecific hybrid populations: (A) Asclepias tuberosa (mother), (B) A. curassavica, (C) A. fascicularis, (D) A. incarnata, (E) A. hirtella, (F) A. purpurascens, (G) A. syriaca, and (H) A. speciosa. (HortScience horts 56, 7) CAES News
Milkweed Hybridization
The research, led by College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences doctoral candidate Mary Lewis and horticulture professor Matthew Chappell, focused on breeding a milkweed plant with commercially desirable traits that would support pollinators.
Assistant Professor Li Yang works in a controlled environment growth room for Arabidopsis thaliana research. CAES News
Aging and Immunity
Like people, plants face challenges from microbial pathogens throughout their lifespan. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has provided Li Yang, an assistant professor of plant immunity at the University of Georgia, with the Maximizing Investors’ Research Award (MIRA) totalling $1.75 million to continue his research on the molecular mechanisms of age-related resistance in plants.
CAES senior Trent Sutton says he has gained a new appreciation for all the work that goes into a finished bottle of wine.  CAES News
Vineyard Internships
When students begin seeking internships, they look forward to gaining firsthand experience in their chosen fields and seek opportunities that will help further their education and develop future job skills. Some may get stuck making coffee, sorting files or answering phones, but for three University of Georgia interns, the summer internship experience has been much more engaging.
Hemp is the same species as marijuana (Cannabis sativa), and the only difference is a legal one: Plants with less than 0.3% of the chemical that gives users a “high”— tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — are hemp, and anything over 0.3% THC is marijuana. CAES News
Hemp Genetics
When you buy something at the store, you have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting no matter where you buy it — a Coke is a Coke, Oreos are Oreos — and whether you buy them in Atlanta or Seattle doesn’t really change what you get. Farmers are in a similar position when they choose what to plant, but in the burgeoning field of industrial hemp, it turns out that things are much more complicated.