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Researchers in the US and Senegal are studying why young people leave peanut farming behind and move to the city, an important question for the future of farming in Senegal’s Groundnut Basin. University of Georgia PhD student Pierre Diatta and Virginia Tech’s Brad Mills (far left and left), will present early findings of the study, along with UGA agricultural economist Genti Kostandini (far right), in a webinar next week. The team is working with Katim Toure, a collaborator at ENSA (École Nationale Supérieure d'Agriculture) in Senegal. CAES News
Young Senegalese Farmers
All over the world, farmers are aging and young people are moving to more urban areas for economic opportunities. Leaders wonder what factors push young people to abandon agriculture and whether technology or other tools can make farming a more attractive option for the next generation. Next week, researchers from the University of Georgia and Virginia Tech will present early findings from research exploring those questions in Senegal, where a team surveyed more than 1,000 peanut-growing households to explore challenges among peanut producers and learn the main reasons why young people turn away from agriculture.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s Georgia 4-H program is one of 21 Georgia organizations to receive AmeriCorps funding to support programming across the state. CAES News
AmeriCorps and 4-H
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s Georgia 4-H program is one of 21 Georgia organizations to receive AmeriCorps funding to support programming across the state.
UGArden Containers become works of art CAES News
UGArden Containers
Surplus military shipping containers have new life as food storage units at UGArden, thanks to students from the Lamar Dodd School of Art and a few gallons of paint.
Professor David Bertioli and his wife, Soraya Leal-Bertioli, senior research scientist, work together with peanut plants in their greenhouses at the Center for Applied Genetic Technologies. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Wild Peanut Genes
A decade ago, University of Georgia plant scientists David and Soraya Bertioli were living and working in Brazil when they began to wonder about peanut plants they encountered in different corners of the world with an astounding ability to withstand fungal diseases without the use of fungicides. The Bertiolis wondered if these different plants might all have something in common. Did they owe their natural resistance to a single genetic source?
Wayne Hanna, best known for developing TifTuf, the strongest turfgrass ever produced at UGA, has established several endowments supporting research at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Georgia Mountain Endowment
For nearly 50 years, turfgrass researcher Wayne Hanna pursued his professional goals at the University of Georgia, first with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), then as a full professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Troutman Tracey D. CREAMERY CAES News
Troutman 40 Under 40
Informed by her upbringing as a small-town girl entrenched in a rich agricultural legacy spanning generations, Tracey Troutman understands the impact that a single experience can have on the lives of young agricultural leaders. Most importantly, she understands the rippling effect it can have on the landscape of American agriculture.
Georgia 4-H youth participate in the State Land Judging Competition at the C.W. Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camila, Georgia. CAES News
4-H Land Judging
More than 25 Georgia 4-H youth participated in the 2021 State Land Judging contest at the University of Georgia’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camila, Georgia. Four counties from across the state brought teams to compete.
A new $1.5 million grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will help UGA scientists delve into the dynamics of coastal Georgia wetlands, researching how collapsing marshes can affect property values and storm resiliency in coastal communities. CAES News
Balancing Act
The forces at work in a marsh require a delicate balancing act. Rising and falling tidewaters keep clumps of Spartina grasses from growing too dense. But too much water makes it difficult for them to survive. Tip this balance too far in either direction and the marsh ecosystem collapses, resulting in a population of different plants — or no plants at all.
“To my knowledge, this is the all-time highest funding amount the UGA IPM program has received, which is incredible because this is a highly competitive national grant,” said Ash Sial, coordinator of UGA's integrated pest management program. CAES News
IPM Grant
An impressive team of University of Georgia researchers has received $765,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture Crop Protection and Pest Management Program to support the continuation of integrated pest management (IPM) programming throughout the state over the next three years.