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233 results found for Tifton
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Nick Place, UGA Extension Agent Black Carter, Georgia Farmer of the Year Bruce Redmond, and Assistant Dean for Extension Mark McCann gather after Redmond was awarded. (Photo by Maggie Wooten) CAES News
2024 Georgia Farmer of the Year
Building on the foundation set by his father in Effingham County, Shiloh Farms owner Bruce Redmond has expanded his operation through innovation and dedication, earning him the honor of 2024 Georgia Farmer of the Year, presented at the 2024 Georgia Ag Forecast in Tifton, Georgia, on Jan. 26. Nominated by Blake Carter, the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent for Effingham County, Redmond assumed full ownership and operation of Shiloh Farms in 2018.
Rachel Itle and Ty Torrance CAES News
40 Under 40
Two faculty members in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Cooperative Extension were named to the Fruit and Vegetable 40 under 40 Class of 2023. The award ceremony will be held during the Great Lakes Fruit, Vegetable and Farm Market EXPO on Tuesday, Dec. 5, at the DeVos Place Convention Center in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Conner Hall CAES News
A Dawg Doubles Back
For Dean Kopsell, newly appointed associate dean for academic affairs for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, moving to Athens is like coming home. Currently professor and chair of the Environmental Horticulture Department at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Kopsell, a two-time UGA alumnus and devoted Georgia Bulldog fan, is eager to return to the Classic City and excited about the opportunity to serve his alma mater and the students of CAES.
More than a century of research at UGA underpins the field of plant pathology and pieces together the complex relationship between microbes and plants. CAES News
Plant Pathology
For more than a century, generations of researchers in the University of Georgia's Department of Plant Pathology have been at the leading edge of knowledge and innovation. As these researchers pass down their knowledge, their foundational scientific exploration helps safeguard crops, advance agricultural practices and ensure food security, not only in Georgia but far beyond its borders.
Warnell professor Kris Irwin (right) helps campers set leaf-litter traps to capture macroinvertebrates, small amphibians and other organisms during Georgia 4-H Natural Resources Exploration Camp at Rock Eagle 4-H Center. CAES News
Exploration Camp
A dozen 4-H’ers from around Georgia were the first explorers to experience Georgia 4-H’s newest summer program — Natural Resources Exploration Camp — and learn about wildlife, forestry, fisheries and other natural resources from University of Georgia faculty.
UGA experts are asking residents to report sighting of the spotted lanternfly, an invasive pest that causes economic damage to horticultural and agricultural industries. (Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Invasive Spotted Lanternfly
State governments are asking people to be on the lookout for an invasive insect pest called spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula). University of Georgia experts say vigilant prevention strategies, early detection and timely interventions can help keep them from spreading into Georgia and elsewhere. While they do not bite or sting humans or animals, spotted lanternflies feed on host plants including grape vines, hardwoods, and ornamental and fruiting trees.
While peach production in Georgia peaked in 1928 at nearly 8 million bushels, production has slowly dwindled ever since, and the blueberry industry, which started taking root in the state in the 1960s, has captured the top spot among the Peach State’s fruit crops. CAES News
Blueberries on the Rise
While peach production in Georgia peaked in 1928 at nearly 8 million bushels, production has slowly dwindled ever since, and the blueberry industry, which started taking root in the state in the 1960s, has captured the top spot among the Peach State’s fruit crops. While Georgia ranks third nationally for both blueberry and peach production, the blueberry far outstrips it’s fuzzy cousin.
Historic HH Tift Building CAES News
UGA-Tifton Renovations
To meet the needs of a rapidly changing agricultural landscape and a growing campus population, the University of Georgia Tifton campus is undergoing crucial infrastructure upgrades to bring its more than century-old facilities up to 21st-century standards. Michael Toews, assistant dean for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on the Tifton campus, said the renovations will create an environment where faculty can thrive for the next 100 years.
“Money” magazine highlights UGA within Best Colleges in America 2023 list. CAES News
Top Ranking
The University of Georgia was recently recognized as one of the best colleges in the country through a top ranking from “Money” magazine in its annual Best Colleges in America list. Last year, the university’s four-year completion rate increased to a record 75.1% while the six-year completion rate grew to 88.1%. With a retention rate of 94.3%, UGA’s success exceeds the average completion and retention rates of peer institutions.