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Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue to control Palmer amaranth even after their corn is harvested. CAES News
Brake Herbicide
Peanuts, although a major crop in Georgia, are a minor crop in the U.S., with only about 1.5 million acres planted — versus approximately 90 million acres each of field corn and soybeans. Due to its limited acreage, there are not many herbicides solely developed for peanuts by major agrichemical companies. Unfortunately, emerging herbicide resistance problems in pernicious weeds like Palmer amaranth are of increasing concern in peanut-producing states and growers need more tools to combat these weeds.
Irrigator Pro App Credits Austn CAES News
Irrigation Scheduling
As climate variability increasingly affects producers across the Southeastern U.S., Wes Porter spends a lot of time thinking about water — specifically, crop irrigation — and how available tools can benefit farmers threefold.
The East Asian Joro spider, officially known as Trichonephila clavata, likely arrived in the U.S. on a shipping container around 2013. The species is native to Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and China. CAES News
Joro Spiders
Joro spiders are polarizing figures. If you live in Georgia, you’ve likely seen the massive-but-harmless spiders hanging between power lines or from the eaves of your house, their golden webs glistening in the sunlight. While some find them a fascinating effect of globalization, others don’t care how they got here. They just want them gone.
Clockwise from left, four UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students — Therese “Tess” Thompson, Lydia Griffin, James “Thomas” Maddox and Kirsten Flinn — were selected as Ratcliffe Scholars in 2021-22, and each has participated in life-changing immersive learning experiences. CAES News
Ratcliffe Scholars
In a world filled with screens and devices, the world is virtually at our fingertips each second of every day. It is easy to look at pictures and videos of places you would like to visit, watch live streaming of events happening around the globe, connect with other cultures or perspectives in a chat box, or even learn a new skill by simply donning a pair of virtual reality goggles. But one method of learning remains unmatched in educational quality — hands-on, experiential learning.
On a seven-acre research site in Plains, Georgia, where former President Jimmy Carter’s family used to grow peanuts and soybeans now sits a solar farm of more than 3,800 panels. UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers are testing wildflowers like red clover (pictured) planted among the panels to measure habitat success over several seasons. CAES News
Biodiversity on Solar Farms
As solar farms pop up across the U.S., researchers at the University of Georgia are working to improve the biodiversity on solar sites as part of a larger, multidisciplinary research program designed to support both sustainable energy and ecosystem health.
According to Georgia Organics, “Land Steward award winners not only foster a better environment through the soil, but through their larger community through leadership, education, and outreach.” CAES News
Land Steward Award
For nearly three decades, Juan Carlos Díaz-Pérez has been contributing to the field of sustainable vegetable production, focusing on organic agriculture as a professor in the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture. This month, Georgia Organics is recognizing his work with the 2022 Land Steward Award.
George Vellidis, a professor in the department of crop and soil sciences and University Professor, reviews surface water runoff data with students at the UGA Tifton campus. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Integrative Precision Agriculture Institute
The University of Georgia is leveraging faculty expertise and strengthening industry ties through a new Institute for Integrative Precision Agriculture whose research and outreach will help sustainably feed a growing global population.
UGA horticulture scientist Ye Juliet Chu is the latest peanut researcher in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to produce three breeding lines from peanut’s wild relatives. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Disease-Resistant Hybrids
Using proven production practices to fight disease in the field, Georgia farmers produce half the peanuts grown in the U.S. each year. Modern peanut varieties carry few genetic defenses against some of the more devastating diseases, so peanut farmers carefully consider when to plant, whether to irrigate and when to apply fungicide and insecticide to keep those diseases from infecting the plant.
2022 Georgia Ag Forecast logo CAES News
2022 Georgia Ag Forecast
Registration slots are still available to attend the 2022 Georgia Ag Forecast on Jan. 28. The annual event will be held in one location this year, at the University of Georgia Tifton Conference Center on the UGA Tifton campus, with a live virtual registration option available.