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Browse Plant Pathology Stories - Page 11

228 results found for Plant Pathology
Peanut plants under water in Plains, Georgia.
May 31, 2018 CAES News
Rainy Impact
Two consecutive weeks of rainfall in Georgia stunted the growth of the state’s peanut crop and created ideal conditions for diseases in vegetable fields, leaving farmers scrambling to decide what to do next.
Students can study at the UGA Tifton campus in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Double Dawgs
The University of Georgia’s Double Dawgs program is a significant recruiting tool for the university’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), according to Breanna Coursey, CAES director of student and employer engagement.
Carolyn Einertson, who was mentored by Stephen Nickerson of the Department of Animal and Dairy Science, won first place in the oral presentation section of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium with her talk, “Using Pre-Calving Mammary Secretions to Predict Udder Infection Status in Dairy Heifers.” CAES News
Undergraduate Research
Almost 50 University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students showcased their research projects and competed in the seventh annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium on April 11.
Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia. CAES News
Safety Training
Using grant funds from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture has developed safety training for green industry employees. To date, these programs have reached more than 4,000 workers.
Group of truffles. CAES News
Truffles
University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman has studied the viability of truffles in the state’s pecan orchards for years. This winter, he will advance his research by introducing the European variety of truffles to Georgia pecan trees.
Michelle Momany, professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, and Marin Brewer, associate professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Plant Pathology, recently received a $197,798 contract from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study antifungal resistance in agricultural settings. Their study will focus on Aspergillus fungi, which can cause crop loss and dangerous lung infections in those with compromised immune systems. CAES News
Fungicide Resistance
There are a limited number of compounds available to combat fungal infections in both plants and people. A team of University of Georgia researchers is helping to assess the risk posed by fungi developing widespread resistance to the stable of antifungal compounds used in the United States.
The bean plataspid or kudzu bug CAES News
Exotic Pest Meeting
The Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council will examine the control and management of invasive insects and plants at the council’s annual conference on Monday, Oct. 30, at the University of Georgia Griffin campus. The conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Local officials, regents and University of Georgia President Jere Morehead pose for a photo at the ribbon cutting of the new Turfgrass Research Building on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Turf Team
University of Georgia, state and industry leaders cut the ribbon on Sept. 21 signifying the official openings of three new turfgrass research and education facilities on the Griffin, Tifton and Athens campuses. The largest of the facilities is on the UGA Griffin campus, where the ceremony took place.
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Think Ahead
Georgia’s hot, muggy summers provide the perfect conditions for diseases to thrive in. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little says the secret to fighting diseases in homegrown vegetables is to stay a few steps ahead of them.