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626 results found for Crop and Soil Sciences
CAES FFAR Fellow Shreena Pradhan and Sujan Paudel CAES News
FFAR Fellows
Two doctoral candidates in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at University of Georgia have been selected for the 2021 class of the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) Fellows program.
The UGA cotton research team identified 24 Georgia counties where the presence of cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV) has been confirmed from commercial fields and UGA research farms during 2018-2019. CAES News
Cotton Leaf Roll Dwarf Virus
While aphids aren’t a direct threat to cotton plants, they can carry a persistent virus that is difficult to control and can cause significant losses in one of Georgia’s most important crops.
UGA Crop Quality Lab manager Daniel Jackson with a load of research samples from the Vidalia Onion Research Center. CAES News
Vidalia Onions
Researchers at the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories (AESL) want to make sure that the Vidalia onions you buy every year are as sweet as you expect them to be.
Jennifer Thompson (left), associate research scientist in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Tim Griffeth (green shirt), an agriculture teacher at North Oconee High School, are among those working in UGArden. CAES News
Grow It Know It
As a kindergarten teacher, Robin Edens was an outlier in the group of mostly middle and high school teachers at the University of Georgia learning how to introduce food-based learning to their students.
CAES senior Trent Sutton says he has gained a new appreciation for all the work that goes into a finished bottle of wine.  CAES News
Vineyard Internships
When students begin seeking internships, they look forward to gaining firsthand experience in their chosen fields and seek opportunities that will help further their education and develop future job skills. Some may get stuck making coffee, sorting files or answering phones, but for three University of Georgia interns, the summer internship experience has been much more engaging.
Hemp is the same species as marijuana (Cannabis sativa), and the only difference is a legal one: Plants with less than 0.3% of the chemical that gives users a “high”— tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — are hemp, and anything over 0.3% THC is marijuana. CAES News
Hemp Genetics
When you buy something at the store, you have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting no matter where you buy it — a Coke is a Coke, Oreos are Oreos — and whether you buy them in Atlanta or Seattle doesn’t really change what you get. Farmers are in a similar position when they choose what to plant, but in the burgeoning field of industrial hemp, it turns out that things are much more complicated.
An official walks across the infield of the National Stadium in Tokyo, home of the 2020 Olympic Games. A UGA-bred grass will be used on the field. (Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images) CAES News
TifSport and TifGrand
The Summer Olympics may be in Japan this year, but Team USA was on home turf when they took the field for today’s Opening Ceremony. The Japan National Stadium’s field is currently sodded with TifSport bermudagrass, developed in south Georgia. One of many grass varieties created and tested at the University of Georgia’s Tifton Campus, TifSport is a dense, medium- to fine-textured grass bred to withstand the high traffic sports fields see while tolerating herbicides.
At UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 2021 Borlaug Undergraduate Scholar Samantha Wegener discovered precision plant breeding — the combination of gene editing and engineering — which showed her a path to solving complicated issues to improve plant varieties. CAES News
2021 Borlaug Undergraduate Scholar
Samantha Wegener enrolled at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus after earning her associate’s degree in biology from the Technical College of the Lowcountry in Beaufort, South Carolina. It was during her last semester in Beaufort that Wegener was introduced to the world of plant breeding.
Large patch disease, pictured here, can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible. CAES News
Large Patch
As warm-season turfgrasses continue to green up, diseases are rearing their ugly heads. The main culprit this time of year is a fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, that causes large patch disease in lawns. Large patch can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible.