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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are urging consumers to avoid eating romaine lettuce and romaine lettuce blends until the source of an E. coli outbreak can be found. CAES News
Romaine Recall
In the midst of the third outbreak of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce in less than two years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urges consumers to avoid buying or eating any romaine lettuce.
A year after the devastation of Hurricane Michael, Georgia's pecan farmers are preparing for this year's crop. Pictured are pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecan Yields
Georgia’s pecan growers will have a limited supply this year due to weather conditions that affected the quality of the pecans and Hurricane Michael’s impact, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Leyland cypress trees grow as a property border in a lawn in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
New Plants
Now is the best time of the year to install new trees, shrubs and perennial plants. Although cold weather won’t allow the aboveground parts to grow much, the roots will continue to grow and expand, allowing the plant to become established. By next summer, these trees and plants will be able to tolerate the intense heat and dry conditions.
August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible. CAES News
Grape Growers
With the growth and increased marketability of the state’s wine industry, Athens, Georgia, is hosting new conferences that will focus on how to create quality fruit and turn it into a palatable beverage. The Southeastern Regional New Grape Growers Conference will be held at the University of Georgia’s South Milledge Greenhouse Complex in Athens on Dec. 11.
Andre da Silva is the new Extension vegetable specialist on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Extension Vegetable Specialist
New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva will improve vegetable production in Georgia through irrigation — and fertilizer-based research on the UGA Tifton campus.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Fruit Shape
From elongated tubes to near-perfect spheres, vegetables come in almost every size and shape. But what differentiates a fingerling potato from a russet or a Roma tomato from a beefsteak? Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of some of our favorite fruits, vegetables and grains.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecan Prices
Despite a low supply of Georgia-grown pecans, Georgia producers are faced with lower prices for what remains of the pecan crop after Hurricane Michael. 
Jessie Holbrook of Union County, who submitted a pumpkin weighing 644 pounds, took first place in the Georgia 4-H pumpkin-growing contest this year.  CAES News
Giant Pumpkins
Pumpkins are a staple of the fall season. Some people like pumpkins baked in pie, and some like them carved and lit up on their front porches for Halloween. Georgia 4-H’ers, on the other hand, like them to weigh hundreds of pounds. 
Some farms experienced close to 90 percent loss of their vegetable crops last week when Hurricane Michael tore through southwestern Georgia. 
In this Grady County field, the wind lodged plants and defoliated them, exposing the peppers to sun damage. CAES News
Vegetable Damage
With the state’s late summer and fall vegetable crop close to harvest, Georgia vegetable farmers estimate more than $480 million in losses from Hurricane Michael.