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384 results found for Entomology
Domestic cats become infected with bobcat fever after being bitten by an infected Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum). A female Lone Star tick is shown here on a fingertip for size. CAES News
Bobcat Fever
Experts at the University of Georgia are urging cat owners across the state to proactively protect their pets as cases of cytauxzoonosis, or bobcat fever, an often fatal tick-borne disease, are spiking in middle Georgia.
In the sculptured resin bee (left), females have a pointed abdomen, while the males have a blunt edge. Both males and females have a striated abdomen with raised bands. The thorax and abdomen of the carpenter bee (right) are connected, bald and smooth. CAES News
Sculptured Resin Bees
University of Georgia entomologists are seeking citizen help to document the presence of the sculptured resin bee — also known as the giant resin bee — an invasive bee that could threaten the native carpenter bee population.
Assistant Professor Carmen Blubaugh focuses her teaching and research on addressing pest problems in crop production. Her work focuses on providing management tools that reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and on understanding and predicting some of the numerous ecological factors that control predator-prey dynamics. CAES News
Teaching for Outcomes
Agroecologist and entomologist Carmen Blubaugh has big plans for her service-learning course taught through the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and her efforts have been recognized with her selection as a 2021-22 Service-Learning Fellow at the University of Georgia.
CAES Dean and Director Nick Place (left) and UGA blueberry entomologist Ashfaq Sial ceremonially plant the first blueberry bush in the new research orchard at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Blueberry Research
Native to North America, blueberries are the most-recently commercially domesticated fruit in the U.S. Just a little over a century ago researchers began studying this wild berry with an intent to develop improved varieties for commercial cultivation.
(Center, L-R) Resident Dr. Megan Partyka and Dr. Joerg Mayer inspect a beehive frame during a beekeeping class. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA) CAES News
UGA Helps Honeybees
University of Georgia faculty and students are working to better understand pollinators and the threats they face. Pollinating bees are vital to healthy crops and a thriving ecosystem, but are under threat of extinction from disease, pollution and other factors. Here are 10 ways UGA is working to help pollinators.
A brood of decades-old 17-year cicadas that have been perfectly preserved. CAES News
Brood X
It has been 17 years since a set of billions of periodical cicadas emerged from their underground chambers and filled the air with boisterous buzzing and desperate mating calls.
The blue orchard mason bee or Osmia lignaria. (Photo: Scott Bauer, USDA Agriculture Research Service, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Imidacloprid Residue
New research funded by the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program and conducted at the University of Georgia shows that imidacloprid residue harms wild bees.
A skipper butterfly at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. (photo by Olivia Smith/UGA) CAES News
Butterfly Abundance
Climate is likely the biggest driver of butterfly abundance change, according to a new study by University of Georgia entomologists.
Trap-jaw ants show remarkable diversity in the length of the jaw and how wide it opens. CAES News
Fast Snaps
Trap-jaw ants are famous for having one of the natural world’s fastest movements, and a new study led by a University of Georgia graduate shows that the core mechanism that allows this speedy movement evolved multiple times within a single ant genus, leading to the spectacular diversification of mandible shape each time.