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Lewis Bartlett presents at the Young Harris Beekeeping Event last May. (Photo by Sidney Rouse) CAES News
Beekeeper Outreach
No line of research is too big or small for Lewis Bartlett — literally. From mammoth extinctions to the western honey bee (Apis mellifera), he’s published on a wide range of topics during and since university. But bees have had his attention since childhood.
This female Joro is the first of the species documented in Spalding County. UGA researchers are asking citizen scientists to report Joro sightings at jorowatch.org to track the species' spread throughout Georgia. CAES News
Spider Drift
Since first making an appearance in Georgia in 2014, Joro spiders have steadily expanded their range in Georgia, and now — just in time for Halloween — the spooky-looking species has reached the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden on the UGA Griffin campus.
Honeybee research CAES News
Honey Bee Vaccine
Vaccines are a proven benefit in the world of animal science. Producers have vaccinated livestock and pet owners have vaccinated dogs and cats for decades. Soon beekeepers may be able to protect their colonies through vaccination. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Dalan Animal Health have teamed up to advance the world’s first honey bee vaccine.
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia's mosquito populations mercifully low, but that's no reason for Georgians to let down their guard, especially this season. CAES News
Mosquito Season Ongoing
Cooler weather may be upon us, but as we open windows and head outside, it is important to remember that we are still in mosquito season. Recent rains have filled all of the containers, cracks and crevices that can hold water around our homes and neighborhoods. While working around my yard, I have found mosquito larvae in the bird bath, a garbage can lid and in the rim of a recycling container.
A bee on a flower in the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia. (UGA file photo) CAES News
Urban Bee Conservation
New research from the University of Georgia revealed that mixed land use — such as developments interspersed with forest patches — improves bee diversity and is leading to new solutions for bee conservation. UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers found that small amounts of development actually had a positive impact on the number of bee species present in a given area.
The Joro Watch team is pursuing a number of approaches to Joro spider research, looking into their impact on native species — like pollinators and native spiders — habitat, lifecycle and management. To help facilitate more conclusive research, UGA experts ask that the public help gather critical data by monitoring spider populations in the environment. (Photo by Carly Mirabile) CAES News
Joro Watch Initiative
They have been described as palm-sized, parachuting creatures with the potential to spread up the East Coast. Now dozens of webs are appearing in trees, on fences and in gardens around the Southeast, and social media and message boards are buzzing with Joro spider sightings. Discussions of eradication methods ranging from chemical sprays to “Joro sticks” are rampant. Joro season is here.
native bee on black eyed Susan (1) CAES News
Protecting Pollinators conference
The Protecting Pollinators in Urban Landscapes national conference will come to Athens, Georgia, from Oct. 10 through 12. The annual conference brings together various research professionals, educators, practitioners and others interested in bee conservation through discussions, talks and continued education sessions. It is the first time in the history of the conference that it will be held in the Southeast.
Peruvian Walking Stick CAES News
2022 Insectival
It doesn’t matter if you love them or fear them, insects are all around us. At Insect-ival, attendees can satiate their curiosity or overcome their fears as they learn about the environmental impact of insects in Georgia — and beyond. The 32nd annual event will be held Sept. 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, a unit of University of Georgia Public Service and Outreach. The event is $5 per person or $20 per family.
Fall armyworm larvae have a white inverted Y-shaped mark on the front of their dark head. They are smooth skinned and vary in color from light tan or green to nearly black, with three yellowish-white hairlines down the back. The larval stage lasts from three to four weeks and can be damaging to turfgrass and crops. (Photo by USDA Agricultural Research Service Photo Unit, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Fall armyworms
Over the past couple of weeks, I have received numerous calls from curious homeowners and frustrated farmers regarding the dreaded fall armyworm. Damage to established turf is most often aesthetic. However, newly planted sod or sprigs can be severely damaged or even killed by fall armyworm feeding.