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Browse Entomology Stories - Page 13

384 results found for Entomology
Turkestan cockroach, Blatta lateralis, a cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter. Photo by Lisa Ames, UGA Cooperative Extension. CAES News
New Roach
A new cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter.
The Asian longhorned tick, an invasive tick species recently identified in several Eastern U.S. states, has been documented as far south as North Carolina. CAES News
Tick Smart
Georgia is already home to 22 species of ticks, but there may be another tiny bloodsucker hiding in the woods on your next hike.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Field Day
Farmers and industry supporters are invited to the annual University of Georgia Cotton and Peanut Research Field Day to be held on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018, on the UGA Tifton campus and UGA research farms in Tift County.
Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension weed specialist, was among the scientists who shared their findings at the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day held on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. McCullough is shown telling visitors the results of his study on bluegrass control in Bermuda grass. CAES News
Turfgrass Updates
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day, held Aug. 9 on the UGA Griffin campus, provided research-based information about the production and management of turfgrass from UGA scientists and UGA Extension specialists.
Argentine ants feeds on Terro liquid bait CAES News
Insect ID
Have you ever spotted a bug in your house and not known what it was? The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) hosts annual integrated pest management (IPM) workshops focused on the home to help pest control operators identify and manage household pests.
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Pollinator Census
The bees and other pollinators that fuel Georgia agriculture are crucial to the state’s economy, but no one really knows how many there are. In honor of National Honey Day, August 18, UGA Cooperative Extension is announcing an ambitious plan to gauge the size and effect of the state’s pollinator population.
The Georgia Structural Pest Control Training Facility is located on the University of Georgia's campus in Griffin, Georgia. The facility was built to train and educate pest management professionals, regulatory inspectors and Cooperative Extension personnel on the biology and management of pests in the home, business and school environments. CAES News
Pests in Schools
Georgia has strict regulations and rules when it comes to managing pests at schools. The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) offers a biannual workshop on integrated pest management (IPM) for pest control operators who have school contracts in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. The program will host the fall 2018 School IPM Workshop on Thursday, Aug. 23.
Millipedes are often called “thousand-legged worms.” They don't carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants, but some species are capable of secreting chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. CAES News
Creepy Crawlers
Millipedes and centipedes often come indoors and strike fear in homeowners. Millipedes aren’t poisonous, but some species can secrete chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. Centipedes seldom bite, but their jaws contain poison glands.
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
Mosquito Season
Georgians only face a few more weeks of mosquito season, but the state’s residents need to stay vigilant to keep mosquito populations in check.