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To help create a less stressful holiday meal, University of Georgia Extension specialists offer these tips. Plan ahead. 
Don't go it alone. Resist the urge to buy new things or try new recipes. Set realistic expectations for family affairs. Consider a seating chart. Remember, the traditional turkey your family has always enjoyed will round out your holiday meal much better than a half-frozen, half-cooked, deep-fried turkey would. CAES News
To help create a less stressful holiday meal, University of Georgia Extension specialists offer these tips. Plan ahead. 
Don't go it alone. Resist the urge to buy new things or try new recipes. Set realistic expectations for family affairs. Consider a seating chart. Remember, the traditional turkey your family has always enjoyed will round out your holiday meal much better than a half-frozen, half-cooked, deep-fried turkey would.
CDC guidelines, precautions should guide holiday celebrations
As the holiday season arrives, the traditional images of loved ones crowded around a dinner table groaning under the weight of the holiday feast may look a little different this year: The recent surge in COVID-19 cases has prompted rising fears that holiday gatherings may accelerate the spread of the virus.
Ted Futris is project director on a recently awarded five-year, $6.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that aims to provide Georgia couples with healthy relationship skills and financial guidance. CAES News
Ted Futris is project director on a recently awarded five-year, $6.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that aims to provide Georgia couples with healthy relationship skills and financial guidance.
Giving thanks can keep marriages going
For resilient marriages, thanks is best given year-round, not just at the holidays. That’s according to University of Georgia researchers at the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Growth of fairy ring fungi begin in the center of a ring and expand outward in a uniform, circular pattern over time. Mushrooms might only be visible during periods of wet weather, particularly in the fall. CAES News
Growth of fairy ring fungi begin in the center of a ring and expand outward in a uniform, circular pattern over time. Mushrooms might only be visible during periods of wet weather, particularly in the fall.
Wet fall weather can cause abundance of fungus
Many residents have noticed mushrooms popping up in lawns and landscapes this season. When the “fungus among us” forms a circle or arc pattern, it’s commonly known as a fairy ring. According to medieval folklore, they were thought to appear after a band of fairies had danced in a circle. In some cases, fairy ring mushrooms can cause turfgrass discoloration or abnormal growth in lawns.
Katelyn Bickett (left), a senior agricultural communications major from Chickamauga, Georgia, and Brooke Raniere (right), a junior environmental economics major from Peachtree City, Georgia, will spend 12 weeks in the state Capitol during the legislative session that begins in January 2021. CAES News
Katelyn Bickett (left), a senior agricultural communications major from Chickamauga, Georgia, and Brooke Raniere (right), a junior environmental economics major from Peachtree City, Georgia, will spend 12 weeks in the state Capitol during the legislative session that begins in January 2021.
CAES students chosen for Georgia Agribusiness Council internships
Two students from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been chosen for Georgia Agribusiness Council Legislative Internships for the spring 2021 Georgia General Assembly legislative session.
UGA researchers will evaluate the impact that detailed flood risk information has on home prices in high-risk zones, the purchase of flood insurance policies and community-level risk mitigation actions. They will also try to determine how communities use different types of flood risk information and how those sources influence their perceptions of flood risk. CAES News
UGA researchers will evaluate the impact that detailed flood risk information has on home prices in high-risk zones, the purchase of flood insurance policies and community-level risk mitigation actions. They will also try to determine how communities use different types of flood risk information and how those sources influence their perceptions of flood risk.
UGA researchers examine economic impact of flooding through national partnership
As residents across the state deal with periods of flood-level rainfall, University of Georgia researchers announce a partnership that will enable them to share flood risk data with other scientists across the U.S.
Senegal relies on importing dairy products to meet the country’s needs, but there is significant potential to enhance economic development in rural areas by supporting small dairy producers, who are predominantly women. CAES News
Senegal relies on importing dairy products to meet the country’s needs, but there is significant potential to enhance economic development in rural areas by supporting small dairy producers, who are predominantly women.
CAES researchers work to improve food safety in Senegal’s growing dairy industry
The University of Georgia has received a $700,000 grant from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety to help improve food safety in the rapidly growing dairy industry in Senegal.
The winners of the 2020 D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence are Bob Kemerait, Esther van der Knaap, Gregory Colson, Phillip Edwards and Tim Coolong. CAES News
The winners of the 2020 D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence are Bob Kemerait, Esther van der Knaap, Gregory Colson, Phillip Edwards and Tim Coolong.
Julie Borlaug continues family mission to eradicate hunger and poverty
The elemental message communicated by Julie Borlaug during the 2020 D.W. Brooks Lecture on Nov. 10 was that no child should be born in a world with hunger and famine.
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir. CAES News
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir.
Biodegradable containers can benefit gardeners
Professional and home gardeners alike can grow landscapes sustainably with the help of biodegradable plant containers, but gardeners may wonder whether these containers decompose quickly enough to avoid hindering plant growth.
Winners for the 2020 Upcycle Challenge are Owen Aymett, grades 2-5, who made a calf roping dummy;  Nandini Patel, grades 6-8, who created throw pillows; and Liam Jay, grades 10-12, who created a video game cabinet. CAES News
Winners for the 2020 Upcycle Challenge are Owen Aymett, grades 2-5, who made a calf roping dummy;  Nandini Patel, grades 6-8, who created throw pillows; and Liam Jay, grades 10-12, who created a video game cabinet.
Georgia 4-H youth upcycle trash into practical, useful objects
Georgia 4-H students rose to the occasion during the 4-H Upcycle Challenge, which encouraged youth to reuse — or upcycle — materials that normally would have been discarded or recycled to create functional items.

About the Newswire

The CAES newswire features the latest popular science and lifestyle stories relating to agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences as well as UGA Extension programs and services around the state.

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