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Browse Field Crops, Forage and Turfgrass Production Stories

623 results found for Field Crops, Forage and Turfgrass Production
Sod prices, such as for bermudagrasses like those developed by UGA turfgrass breeders, are higher this year for homeowners and industry. CAES News
Sod Prices Up
Low inventory of some varieties, combined with economic pressures exacerbated by supply chain and global issues, are pushing up the price of a meticulously manicured lawn this spring.
The new 22,000-square-foot soccer field allows UGA-Griffin faculty and students to perform research and Extension activities, as well as hands-on learning. Additionally, the field is used by the campus and local community several times a week for pick-up games. CAES News
Griffin Turf Partnerships
Any time you walk through a park, play a recreation-league soccer game or enjoy an afternoon on the golf course, you are using the products of the multibillion-dollar turfgrass industry. In Georgia alone, turfgrass covers 1.8 million acres, making it one of the largest agricultural commodities in the state, employing more than 100,000 people with a maintenance value of $1.56 billion.
Mark McCann (from left) joins Justin Pate, Christian Pate, Scotty Raines, Melanie Raines, Celie Raines, Guy Hancock and CAES Dean Nick Place at a celebration announcing Scotty Raines' selection as 2022 Georgia Farmer of the Year during the annual meeting of the Georgia Agribusiness Council.  CAES News
2022 Georgia Farmer Of The Year
For Scotty Raines, the best part of farming is watching the fruits of his labor — witnessing those tiny seeds crack through the ground, bursting with life. Awe and dedication have paid off for Raines, who was just recognized with the title of 2022 Georgia Farmer of the Year by the Georgia Agribusiness Council.
UGA horticulture scientist Ye Juliet Chu is the latest peanut researcher in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to produce three breeding lines from peanut’s wild relatives. (Submitted photo) CAES News
Disease-Resistant Hybrids
Using proven production practices to fight disease in the field, Georgia farmers produce half the peanuts grown in the U.S. each year. Modern peanut varieties carry few genetic defenses against some of the more devastating diseases, so peanut farmers carefully consider when to plant, whether to irrigate and when to apply fungicide and insecticide to keep those diseases from infecting the plant.
CAES researchers Mussie Habteselassie, Bochra Bahri and David Jespersen are testing the benefits of using nanobubble-infused irrigation water to more efficiently grow sods and maintain turfgrass. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Tiny Bubbles
While the old song “Tiny Bubbles” lauds the happy effervescence of a glass of sparkling wine, new University of Georgia research on nanobubbles seeks to discover whether the tiniest of bubbles can hold beneficial properties for turfgrass.
Examples of a living mulch (top) and cereal rye cover crop terminated prior to planting (bottom). CAES News
Cover Crops, Living Mulches
For most row crop producers in Georgia, corn, cotton and peanut are planted in the spring and harvested in late fall. After harvest, the ground is left relatively bare, with the residue of the harvested crop the only organic material left on the ground. This is where cover crops come in.
Beef cattle (file photo) CAES News
Cattle Emissions
It is not difficult to find somebody talking about methane these days. Simply turn on the TV, open your computers to your news affiliate of choice or log into any social media platform.
When implementing grazing management strategies, one of the key tools to success is using temporary fencing technology. This technology is a fantastic advancement that allows us the opportunity to adjust our grazing paddock size multiple times throughout the year based on animal need and number, forage growth and availability. (Photo by Justin Burt) CAES News
Re-establishing Alfalfa
Alfalfa, once a dominant forage in Georgia, is the third-highest crop for economic returns in the United States. Combined with cheap nitrogen prices, difficulty growing the desirable forage crop in Georgia’s challenging climate led to a decline in alfalfa production in the state after its peak in the 1960s.
Plant pathology Professor Bob Kemerait talks about peanut diseases during the Georgia Peanut Tour in Midville, Georgia, in 2014. CAES News
Field Guy
When University of Georgia peanut pathologist Bob Kemerait does something, he does it wholeheartedly. A passionate advocate for producers both near his academic home at the University of Georgia Tifton campus and around the world, Kemerait describes himself as “a field guy,” most comfortable among the rows detecting, diagnosing and addressing the myriad diseases and pests that threaten Georgia’s second-largest row crop.