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The 2020 Southeastern Hay Contest grand prize was awarded to Brian Johnson of McKenney, Virginia, for his alfalfa hay sample (not pictured). Pictured from left to right are Ash Alt, Massey Ferguson Field Execution Manager; Lisa Baxter, UGA Forage Extension Specialist; Leanne Dillard, Auburn University Forage Extension Specialist; and Marcelo Wallau, UF Forage Extension Specialist. CAES News
2020 Hay Contest Winners
Despite the challenges of the pandemic, 370 entries were submitted in the 2020 Southeastern Hay Contest (SEHC), just below the record-setting number of submissions for 2019. More states submitted samples to the contest than ever before, with nine represented.
Natural predators from turf lawns were placed in petri dishes where the marks made by the insects were preserved in soft clay. CAES News
Tracking Bug Tracks
Modeling clay isn’t limited to art classrooms and sculpting studios. University of Georgia researchers developed a tool to track beneficial insects in turfgrass systems using clay models. Tracking these good predators can help develop eco-friendly pest management techniques for both home lawns and commercial sod growers.
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist CAES News
Parasitic Hijackers
A newly published study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and several partner institutions reveals a discovery that could lead to new control strategies for a tiny-but-persistent agricultural pest that causes enormous soybean losses.
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Three products approved
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved new five-year registrations for two dicamba products and extended the registration of an additional dicamba product for use on dicamba-tolerant cotton and soybeans in a decision estimated to save growers and producers of the products millions of dollars in lost revenue.
Fescue contains an endophyte — a fungus that lives within the plant — that gives the grass desirable attributes but produces alkaloids that are toxic to animals who graze on it, a defense mechanism meant to prevent overgrazing. Pictured are the slender tubes of the endophytic fungus (Neotyphodium coendophialum) in the intercellular spaces of tall fescue. CAES News
Fescue Toxicity Grant
A $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will allow researchers at the University of Georgia to examine the minutiae of cattle and fescue microbiome interaction to find targets that will help mitigate the effects of fescue toxicosis, a forage-related condition that costs the U.S. beef industry more than $1 billion each year.
UGA Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney speaks about peanuts during the Midville Field Day in 2019. Faculty will give presentations online for this year's field day. CAES News
Midville Field Day 2020
University of Georgia faculty will share the latest research on cotton, soybeans, corn and other southeast Georgia crops during the annual Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center Field Day held online Aug. 12.
Wayne Hanna, left, and Brian Schwartz in a turfgrass research field at UGA-Tifton. (UGA photo taken by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA in 2017) CAES News
TifTuf Recognition
Earlier this spring, the Georgia General Assembly passed a pair of resolutions recognizing the University of Georgia-developed bermudagrass TifTuf.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Cotton Demand Down
The rapid spread of COVID-19 has severely impacted the global cotton supply chain. An unexpected reduction in cotton mill use data is observed across all of the major cotton spinning countries, including China, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Turkey and Vietnam.
Georgia turfgrasses are just beginning to "green up," a term used to describe the time when warm-season grasses like bermudagrass begin to turn green after the winter. Warm-season turf green-up is dependent on the soil temperature reaching 65 degrees Fahrenheit. CAES News
Spring Turf
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist, I have recently received numerous calls and emails regarding grass selection and planting. This is likely a result of the recent warm, dry weather, which typically activates people to begin working in their landscape, and the increased number of people currently at home.