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On average, Bradford pear trees live around 10 to 15 years, 20 with luck, and will literally begin to self-destruct with any storm winds that blow through. CAES News
Popular trees provide flower power but don't last the test of time
Some trees naturally live longer than others but, ironically, many of the most popular landscape trees tend to be relatively short-lived. Although their flowers are quite attractive, Bradford or Callery pears are generally considered short-lived trees, and they are also highly invasive.
East Lake Golf Club CAES News
UGA-Griffin student scores job testing turf at PGA Tour Championship
When professional golfer Patrick Cantlay sank the birdie that won him the 2021 PGA TOUR Championship, he did it on turf that had been tested that morning by a student from the University of Georgia’s Griffin campus.
The five finalists pose for a photo after the 2021 FABricate Pitch Contest at the UGA Innovation Hub. CAES News
Calling all students to upcoming FABricate information session
Are you a student with a big idea for a food- or agriculture-related business? Come to the FABricate information session at 6 p.m. Oct. 20 in room 150 of the Miller Learning Center to find out how you can get your idea developed. If you apply, you could win $10,000.
By focusing on one fruit or vegetable per year, UGA Extension agents and teachers can make sure students absorb how to successfully grow that crop. Sign up to participate at bit.ly/livinlavidaokra. CAES News
Get ready to start Livin’ La Vida Okra for Farm to School Month
October is Farm to School Month and this year’s theme is Livin’ La Vida Okra. Farm to School Month, coordinated by Georgia Organics in partnership with UGA Extension, highlights a different fruit or vegetable each year.
Healthier Together hosted a community-wide planting day at Richland Community Garden in Richland, Georgia, southeast of Columbus. CAES News
Rural communities rebuild healthy habits
Obesity affects millions of Americans and increases the risk of stroke, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other causes of premature death. The percentage of U.S. adults with obesity has risen steadily from 13.4% in the early 1960s to the current average of more than 42%.
The tiny Asian longhorned tick (left) compared to the common Lonestar tick. CAES News
Disease-bearing Asian longhorned tick found in north Georgia
As of Sept. 21, an invasive and dangerous pest, the Asian longhorned tick, has been confirmed in north Georgia. Experts are warning livestock producers and the public to be on the lookout, as the ticks can kill an animal by attaching to a host by the hundreds.
Cotton seedlings planted over a rye cover crop. After harvest, cotton fields are planted with a cover crop. Before cotton is planted the next season, the cover crop is killed and rolled , then the cotton seeds are planted using either a no-till or strip-till system. The resulting "mulch" provided by the cover crop residue provides insect habitat, moisture retention and some weed suppression. CAES News
Cover crops provide habitat for predator insects that may help control pests
The use of cover crops has risen among both traditional and organic producers for a variety of reasons — to control erosion, choke out weeds, improve soil health and enhance water availability. Now research by University of Georgia scientists is examining which cover crops also may provide important habitat for predatory insects that could help control disease- and damage-causing pests in cotton.
A drone photo shows turfgrass research plots on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
UGA receives federal grant to study turfgrass water conservation using artificial intelligence
When it comes to taking care of a lawn — whether at home or on a golf course — proper watering makes the difference between a beautiful landscape and a muddy mess. Knowing when and where to water turfgrass can be a tricky process, but thanks to a group of researchers at the University of Georgia and Rutgers University, lawn irrigation could soon be much easier to handle.
For more than a decade, UGA scientist Sonia Hernandez has led a team that’s studying the health and behavior of the American white ibis as it moves from rural to urban areas in South Florida. Their research has implications for other urban wildlife, including coyotes, deer, raccoons and other wading birds. (Photo courtesy of Sonia Hernandez) CAES News
When country ibis become city ibis
The human population in Florida has boomed in the last few decades following migration of people from other states and countries, resulting in rapid urbanization. From the city outskirts, another population is also on the move — the American white ibis that used to occupy the pristine wetlands of the Everglades are now frequent visitors of the urban landscape.

About the Newswire

The CAES newswire features the latest popular science and lifestyle stories relating to agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences as well as UGA Extension programs and services around the state.