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74 results found for Human Development and Family Science
A student hangs her bookbag on a peg outside her classroom door. CAES News
Making the Switch to School
New backpacks, jeans, and boxes of markers and crayons can help get kids ready to go back to school, but how should parents mentally prepare their children?
U.S. currency and credit cards. CAES News
Money Smarts
Conversations with kids about money can be hard, but starting those awkward money dialogues early can go a long way to help children grow into financially responsible adults.
Education and open lines of communication are key for parents to help their children through a cyberbullying situation. CAES News
Cyberbullying
Students today spend more time online than anywhere else, so it’s not a surprise that some of the worst behavior adults remember from their own teenage years — gossiping and bullying — has followed students online and into their newly built social networks.
Kisha Faulk tries her first roasted oyster while her coworker Barbara Worley looks on. The two women were among the participants in a recent Ocean to Table workshop designed to increase consumers' and UGA Extension agents' knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood. CAES News
Ocean to Table
The brainchild of Chatham County Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Agent Jackie Ogden, the Ocean to Table workshop series is designed to increase consumers’ and UGA Extension agents’ knowledge and awareness of Georgia seafood.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say removing your shoes before going indoors can reduce the amount of pollen you track into your home. Other ways to reduce the amount of pollen indoors include wiping your pets' paws before allowing them to come inside and cleaning floors and surfaces often. CAES News
Indoor Pollen
Are your sinuses clogged? Do you feel like you are walking in a sea of yellow dust? Have you washed your car three times this week? Welcome to pollen season in Georgia.
Distracted driving is more than checking or sending text messages on your phone. It is any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking on your phone, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, fiddling with the stereo, entertainment or navigation system or anything that takes your attention away from the task of safe driving. CAES News
Distracted Driving
Taking your eyes off the road for five seconds at 55 miles per hour is like driving the length of a football field with your eyes closed, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Startling, but most of us have glanced at the GPS, grabbed our phone, reprimanded a child or even had a heated conversation, all while driving.  
The UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences will celebrate its 100 year anniversary in 2018.  
Alumni Director Alexis Morgan poses with a banner timeline celebrating the centennial. CAES News
FACS Centennial
In the aftermath of World War I, with a nationwide food shortage raging, the doors of the University of Georgia were opened to women. Ultimately, the demand for technically trained female teachers and home demonstration agents dissolved the resistance to women enrolling at UGA.
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home. CAES News
Fight Mold
Hurricane Irma had slowed down by the time she reached Georgia, reducing the amount of expected structural damage to homes, but flood waters may have left behind a sneaky and dangerous after-effect: mold.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
Drink Water
Did you know that a 10-percent weight loss due to dehydration can make you disoriented and weak and can cause a potential heat stroke? As the hot Georgia summer continues and fall sports and activities begin, it is essential that you stay hydrated. UGA Extension experts say water is still the best choice for doing so.