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Browse Commercial Plant Disease Stories - Page 7

118 results found for Commercial Plant Disease
Onion center rot is a devastating disease for Vidalia onion producers in south Georgia. CAES News
Onion Disease Detection
Onions, one of the biggest vegetable crops in Georgia, risk disease when they are harvested and stored. To solve this issue, University of Georgia researchers have developed new technologies, including a gas sensor and imaging methods, to detect diseases in onions.
Fusarium wilt, a deadly fungal disease that lives in the soil, attacks a watermelon vine in a field in Berrien County. CAES News
Fusarium Wilt
Fusarium wilt reduces watermelon yields in Georgia fields. A University of Georgia Extension agent in one of the state’s most prolific watermelon-producing counties is searching for a way to help save the melons and the farmers’ profits.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Peanut Farm Show
The University of Georgia Tifton Campus will become the center for all things peanut for growers and industry personnel on Thursday, Jan. 15, when the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center hosts the annual Georgia Peanut Farm Show.
Pictured is a tobacco field in Coffee County that was affected by black shank disease. CAES News
Black Shank Disease
April showers washed away chemical treatments and provided moisture for infections in 2014, causing Georgia farmers to lose between 4 and 5 percent of the state’s 12,000-plus tobacco acres to black shank disease.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Peanut Farm Show
The University of Georgia Tifton Campus will become the center for all things peanut for growers and industry personnel on Thursday, Jan. 15, when the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center hosts the annual Georgia Peanut Farm Show.
Nighttime spraying is recommended by UGA plant pathologists in treating peanuts for white mold disease. CAES News
Nighttime/Early Morning Spraying
A University of Georgia plant pathologist is advocating nighttime and early morning fungicide application as an option to combat white mold disease, a perennially devastating disease for Georgia peanut farmers.
When planted in the right container, potted plants can be the gift that keeps on giving all year round. Gift-givers should check the plant for signs of disease and insects to avoid sharing an unhealthy plant. CAES News
Plant Presents
House plants make great holiday gifts, but gift givers should be careful to make sure their gift plant is healthy. Otherwise, that cheery Christmas cactus or festive fern can turn into a pot full of heartache by mid-January.
This picture shows tomato spotted wilt virus damage in peanuts in 2011. CAES News
Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
A University of Georgia Extension plant pathologist is urging Georgia peanut farmers to plant a month earlier next year to keep the threat of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) at bay.
Pecans in a tree on the UGA Ponder Farm in Tifton, Ga. CAES News
Pecan Outlook
Georgia’s dry summer helped save its pecan crop, according to University of Georgia Extension horticulture specialist Lenny Wells.