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Browse Commercial Plant Disease Stories - Page 9

118 results found for Commercial Plant Disease
Tomato leaves can curl in response to environmental stresses, like lack of water, or as a symptom of a disease, like tomato leaf curl virus, shown here. CAES News
Control Plant Diseases
The same fungal, bacteria and viral diseases that affect vegetable farmers can have the same detrimental impact on backyard gardeners’ spring and fall gardens.
In this file photo, an array of pesticides are lined on the shelves of a Griffin, Ga., feed and seed store. CAES News
Pesticide Applicator Classes
Certified pesticide applicators need recertification training and credits to keep their licenses up-to-date. To help provide this training, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has planned pesticide applicator recertification classes in Savannah, Griffin and Cartersville this February.
Nighttime spraying is recommended by UGA plant pathologists in treating peanuts for white mold disease. CAES News
White Mold Disease
Most Georgia peanut farmers do not spray fungicides on their crop at night. But University of Georgia plant pathologists say nighttime is the best time to spray for white mold disease.
Jean Williams-Woodward, UGA CAES plant pathologist, examines impatience plant roots for signs of disease in greenhouse, Athens Campus, October 27, 2009. CAES News
Gardening Symposium
University of Georgia plant pathologist Jean Williams-Woodward will be among the experts presenting at The Inspired Gardener symposium set for Feb. 22 at the Atlanta Botanical Garden.
Here's a look at some of the pecans being researched on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Breeding
Pecan scab — a fungal disease — reduced Georgia’s projected pecan crop by almost half this year. That’s extra motivation for Patrick Conner, who’s attempting to breed a scab-resistant pecan variety at the University of Georgia Tifton campus.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Crop Rotation
Pesticides are a costly but essential tool farmers use to control plant diseases and insects. Crop rotation continues to be a more reliable and economical management strategy.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Crop
The quality and quantity of Georgia’s 2013 pecan crop is in worse shape than originally feared.
Here is a picutre of Phytophthora fruit rot damage on a watermelon in Turner County. CAES News
Phytophthora Fruit Rot
An abundance of summer rainfall soaked farmlands across Georgia and brought devastating disease to the state’s watermelon crop.
This year's winners, from left to right, include Chris McKenzie, UGA Poultry Research Center feed mill supervisor; Sammy Aggrey, professor of poultry science; Steve Stice, director of the Regenerative Bioscience Center, represented by his wife Terry Stice; James Jacobs, Extension agent for Pierce and Ware counties; John Rema, research technician in crop and soil sciences; Georgi Austin, business manager in the crop and soil sciences; Clint Waltz, Extension turfgrass specialist in crop and soil sciences; Terry Centner, professor in agricultural and applied economics; Yao-wen Huang, professor of food science and technology; and William Graves, professor of animal and dairy sciences. CAES News
DW Brooks 2013
On Oct. 1, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recognized its staff and faculty who have demonstrated excellence in the college’s teaching, research and Extension missions with the annual D.W. Brooks awards.