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Browse Commercial Plant Disease Stories - Page 4

118 results found for Commercial Plant Disease
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton Diseases
In addition to root-knot nematodes and target spot disease, Georgia cotton farmers should be prepared to fight bacterial blight, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.
Fusarium wilt is a fungal disease that can considerably damage a watermelon crop. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether fusarium wilt can be managed through fumigation. CAES News
Fusarium Wilt
Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation.
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia. CAES News
Black Shank Disease
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia.
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Production Costs
Georgia’s pecan industry grew by more than 20,000 new acres in the last five years. Pecans are a booming business in Georgia, but University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells says that new farmers should go into the venture knowing that pecans are a costly investment.
Georgia's Southern Piedmont grape farmers are finding success with hybrid varieties popularized in Texas wine country, like these Lenoir grapes grown in Haralson County. CAES News
Georgia's Grape Industry
Georgia’s grape industry, once dormant, is now thriving, according to Phillip Brannen, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit plant pathologist. Growing potential for prosperity in the wine industry will require that farmers stay vigilant about certain diseases, like Pierce’s disease, that could negatively impact production.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
Leaf spot damage seen on a peanut leaf. CAES News
Leaf Spot Disease
Georgia peanut growers are experiencing problematic leaf spot diseases this year due to susceptible varieties and weakening fungicide treatments, according to Albert Culbreath and Tim Brenneman, plant pathologists at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus.
Pictured is a comparison between healthy peanuts and those infected with white mold disease. CAES News
White Mold Disease
Harvest time may be less than a month away for many Georgia peanut farmers, but University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait insists there is still time to treat the crop for white mold disease.
A picture of a corn field from a few years ago. Recent rains have helped this year's corn crop, according to UGA Extension specialist Eric Prostko. CAES News
Road Trip
Like many other young people, plant pathology graduate student Russell Ingram’s friends have an epic road trip planned for this summer. The difference is that instead of setting off for a music festival in the desert or visiting a beach, Ingram’s pals are hitting the road in search of jobs.