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Browse Commercial Plant Disease Stories - Page 6

118 results found for Commercial Plant Disease
Pictured is white mold disease on peanuts at a UGA research farm in Tifton, Georgia. CAES News
White Mold
White mold disease has always been a problem for Georgia peanut farmers, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman. The disease has been even more of a nuisance due to the hot and humid weather conditions this growing season.
Cook County ANR Agent Tucker Price holds up a watermelon plant infected with gummy stem blight disease. CAES News
Watermelon Diseases
Disease in south Georgia’s watermelons was again a problem this year for farmers.
Tim Coolong holds a bell pepper and tomato. Both vegetables, grown on the UGA Tifton Campus, show symptoms of blossom end rot. CAES News
Blossom End Rot
Georgia’s bell pepper farmers experienced a setback in production this spring. According to University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong, some Georgia growers experienced losses of up to 25 percent due to blossom end rot — a calcium-related disorder.
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Nematode Management
In addition to low prices, controlling nematodes is top priority for Georgia cotton farmers. But with one effective control method being taken away and a new one in short supply, University of Georgia researchers and Cooperative Extension agents are working quickly to help farmers find a solution.
Pictured are dug up peanut plants on a dry land peanut field in east Tift County on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. CAES News
Peanut Scouting
Mark Abney’s message to Georgia peanut farmers is the same today as it was two years ago, when he was hired as the University of Georgia’s research and Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist: “We need to be scouting more of our peanuts.”
UGA Extension coordinator Tim Varnedore harvests samples from research plots. CAES News
Exobasidium Disease
University of Georgia researchers have found lime sulfur to be an effective option for blueberry farmers treating for Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot, a disease that affects the crop’s yield and marketability.
Pictured is a dry land peanut field in east Tift County on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. CAES News
Peanut Planting
Unusually warm weather conditions and high soil temperatures have Georgia farmers itching to plant peanuts, but University of Georgia peanut agronomist Scott Monfort cautions peanut producers to hold off until the end of April or beginning of May.
This picture shows tomato spotted wilt virus damage in peanuts in 2011. CAES News
TSWV Research
A University of Georgia entomologist is searching for a way to control tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) by studying thrips – the insect that carries the disease.
Pictured is orange cane blotch, showing the splitting that occurs on the canes. CAES News
Orange Cane Blotch
University of Georgia researchers have found a treatment that kills up to 70 percent of a disease that attacks blackberry plants.