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118 results found for Commercial Plant Disease
Downy mildew disease on a watermelon leaf. CAES News
Downy Mildew Disease
University of Georgia plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta is confident that Georgia watermelon growers will encounter downy mildew at some point during the growing season — it’s just a matter of timing and severity.
This is a partially reconstructed point-cloud of a peanut field. When completed, UGA scientists will be able to tell the height, width, leaf cover, growth and disease anomolies for individual plants and track it through the season. Currently the research project is working to make the 3-d reconstruction accurate to within 1 mm. CAES News
3-D Images
University of Georgia scientist Glen Rains is combining 3-D images and robotics to help farmers identify crop problems before they become an issue that will affect potential yields.
Green beans grow up a trellis in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Garden Plan
This time of the year gardeners get excited about their soon-to-be-planted spring vegetable gardens. They envision lush rows of perfect pods of peas, scrumptiously delicious sweet corn and big, beautiful tomatoes. University of Georgia Extension urges gardeners to wait and put some thought and vision into their garden first.
Southern corn rust appeared at least two weeks early in 2014 (5 June) than it did in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013. Appearing earlier means that this disease will likely be more problematic than in recent years. Corn that is approaching (or has passed) the tassel growth stage is worth protecting if the yield potential is there, according to UGA Extension agent Shane Curry. CAES News
El Nino 2016
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait cautions Georgia corn farmers about the El Nino weather pattern that will likely interfere with planting this March. A delay would increase the likelihood of diseases too, so Kemerait advises growers to plant resistant varieties and be ready to apply fungicides earlier than normal.
Sugarcane aphids at various stages of development. CAES News
Sugarcane Aphids
Sugarcane aphids have turned their back on their namesake and become a major pest for Georgia’s grain sorghum growers. The pest began infesting fields in the state two years ago and, last year, devastated farmers who chose not to apply spray controls, said University of Georgia small grains entomologist David Buntin.
Pictured are three blackberry leaves that have Blackberry Yellow Vein Virus. CAES News
Blackberry Viruses
With no chemical treatments to kill viruses in blackberries, University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen recommends Georgia producers grow tissue-cultured plants.
UGA peanut geneticist Peggy Ozias-Akins, director of the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, examines a peanut blossom. Ozias-Akin's lab on the UGA Tifton Campus focuses on female reproduction and gene transfer in plants. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Awards
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will recognize nine of its finest next month with the D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence and the CAES Faculty and Staff Support Awards.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Crop
There will be between 110 and 120 million pounds of pecans harvested this season, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells estimates, making this year’s Georgia pecan crop the best he’s seen in the last three years.
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. CAES News
Female farmers
Women own 13.6 percent of America’s active farms and their farms produce almost $13 billion worth of goods each year. Just like male farmers, they need access to business and technical information to help make their farms successful. But while many pride themselves on not needing a “women’s only” class on how to work the land or run a business, many other women simply feel more comfortable learning around other female farmers.