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154 results found for Commercial Vegetables
Georgia agricultural leaders took part in a groundbreaking in July at the Sunbelt Expo in Moultrie. The groundbreaking was for the new Spotlight State building, which will be constructed in time for the Expo, to be held Oct. 14-16. Participating in the groundbreaking are (from left): Georgia Agricultural Commissioner Gary Black, Georgia Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Scott Angle, Sunbelt Executive Director Chip Blalock, assistant director of the Georgia Development Authority Donald Wilder, professor of horticulture at Fort Valley State, James E. Brown, Brittany Beasley (representing Colombo North America) and ABAC President David Bridges. CAES News
Sunbelt Expo
Georgia will definitely be on the minds of the estimated 90,000 people that will flock to this year’s Sunbelt Ag Expo in October.
Sugar beets are being researched at UGA as a possible alternative feed source for dairy cattle. CAES News
Sugar Beets
Georgia dairymen may soon have an alternative feed source for their cattle.
Blue Suede blueberries CAES News
Georgia Exports Conference
More than 25 percent of Georgia-grown agricultural crops are exported to other countries and that percent is growing.
Wasp eggs travel on a hornworm that has been parasitized by the wasp and is now used as a host for the wasp's eggs. This is an example of a beneficial insect, the wasp, being used to control a tomato pest in a vegetable garden. CAES News
IPM Workshop
A workshop for small-scale vegetable farmers and home gardeners interested in using integrated pest management techniques is set for Friday, Sept. 19 on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin.
Southern corn rust appeared at least two weeks early in 2014 (5 June) than it did in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013. Appearing earlier means that this disease will likely be more problematic than in recent years. Corn that is approaching (or has passed) the tassel growth stage is worth protecting if the yield potential is there, according to UGA Extension agent Shane Curry. CAES News
Southern Corn Rust
Southern corn rust struck Georgia's corn crop two weeks earlier this season and has spread across the Coastal Plain, says a University of Georgia plant pathologist. If not treated quickly, the annual disease can stunt plants and reduce yields.
Beau Lamb tosses a watermelon into a truck, as Robert Ames writes down its weight while working at the UGA Tifton Campus. The two student workers work for vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong. CAES News
Watermelon Crop
Good yields, reasonable prices early in the season and low disease pressure has Georgia’s watermelon crop producing sweet results, says one University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist.
Co-authored by Thomas Foken, Monique Leclerc's book, Footprints in Micrometeorology and Ecology, is the first textbook on the subject and covers how to interpret meteorological measurements made at a given level over a surface with regard to characteristic properties such as roughness, albedo, heat, moisture, carbon dioxide and other gases. CAES News
Micrometeorology Textbook
Some landscapes — like forests — are known for keeping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Others shed carbon dioxide or other gasses that can affect the environment. Calculating just how much of each gas is held or released can be difficult but University of Georgia scientist Monique Leclerc has literally written the book on the subject.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Onion Crop
Despite a frigid, rain-filled winter, Vidalia onion farmers expect a good, quality crop this season.
A watermelon plant is pictured in a field in Ty Ty, Ga. on Wednesday, April 30. The plant was planted on March 28. CAES News
Watermelon Crop
An abundance of rainfall hurt last year’s watermelon crop in Georgia. This year, late cold snaps stunted the growth of early-planted melons and may cause prices to plummet, say University of Georgia Extension experts.