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Browse Commercial Vegetables Stories - Page 7

154 results found for Commercial Vegetables
UGA horticulturist Tim Coolong poses for a picture alongside some of the kale he is researching on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Kale
University of Georgia horticulturist Tim Coolong believes a vegetable once considered solely a garnish for salad bars could have a sizeable impact for Georgia’s fall gardeners.
Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black examines a pumpkin field at Jaemor Farms with farm manager Drew Echols, Rep. Terry England, UGA President Jere Morehead, CAES Dean J. Scott Angle and other officials during the UGA President's Third Annual Farm Tour. CAES News
UGA President's Farm Tour
From vineyards and vegetable patches to state-of-the-art food processing and food safety operations, agriculture in northeast Georgia is made up of a large and diverse set of enterprises.
Tim Coolong holds a bell pepper and tomato. Both vegetables, grown on the UGA Tifton Campus, show symptoms of blossom end rot. CAES News
Blossom End Rot
Georgia’s bell pepper farmers experienced a setback in production this spring. According to University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong, some Georgia growers experienced losses of up to 25 percent due to blossom end rot — a calcium-related disorder.
A pair of sunburnt watermelons sit in a field in Tift County. CAES News
Georgia Watermelons
High summer temperatures and intense sun could reduce Georgia's end-of-season watermelon production this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Tim Coolong. Because of the increased heat over the past week, risk of sunburn for watermelons in the field has been high. If watermelons do scald, they may not be marketable, which may reduce farmers’ normal timeframe for selling their crop.
Tim Coolong, UGA vegetable horticulturist, looks for squash in a plot on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Squash Research
A University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist is searching for new squash varieties to help Georgia farmers improve the state’s $24.7 million squash industry.
Kale is being researched on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Georgia Kale
A “green superfood” is making its way into the mainstream and into the fields of southwest Georgia farms, according to a University of Georgia vegetable expert. Increased consumer demand in connection with its many health benefits has Georgia farmers planting, and selling, more of the leafy green.
Fresh vegetables grown organically by an Elijay, Ga., farmer CAES News
Community of Opportunity
University of Georgia Extension is connecting vegetable farmers and impoverished families in Dougherty County, Georgia. The desired results are improved eating habits for this southwest Georgia community and a new market for producers.
Collard greens grow in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Collard Boom
Add this to the list of things that Georgians already knew. Collards are good for us, and go with just about anything.
Pictured is a tent-like structure used as shading for bell pepper research on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Bell Pepper Shading
University of Georgia horticulturist Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez has found that covering bell peppers with shading nets increases yields, extends the growing season and makes for more attractive fruit.