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154 results found for Commercial Vegetables
Michelle Momany, professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, and Marin Brewer, associate professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Plant Pathology, recently received a $197,798 contract from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study antifungal resistance in agricultural settings. Their study will focus on Aspergillus fungi, which can cause crop loss and dangerous lung infections in those with compromised immune systems. CAES News
Fungicide Resistance
There are a limited number of compounds available to combat fungal infections in both plants and people. A team of University of Georgia researchers is helping to assess the risk posed by fungi developing widespread resistance to the stable of antifungal compounds used in the United States.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Vegetable Nematologist
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest plant pathologist will focus on improved control of plant-parasitic nematodes, the microscopic, worm-like pests that primarily feed on the roots of Georgia’s vegetable crops.
Fusarium wilt is a fungal disease that can considerably damage a watermelon crop. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether fusarium wilt can be managed through fumigation. CAES News
Fusarium Wilt
Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation.
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016. CAES News
Organic Ag Bootcamp
The University of Georgia’s organic agriculture faculty members are hosting a two-day crash course in organic certification and sustainable growing practices April 22-23 in Athens, Georgia.
Deer are beautiful creatures, but seeing them dining on your landscape plants quickly makes their beauty fade. CAES News
Deer Problem
Georgia’s whitetail deer have reached a nutritional stress period and the current drought situation only compounds the issue. There tends to be two nutritional stress periods during the year for whitetail: the end of summer and the end of winter. Right now, we are at the precipice of the winter stress period.
Georgia Organics Executive Director Alice Rolls applauds as Julie Best, Azalea Moss, Lonnie Edenfield and Martine Olsen receive their Journeyman Farmer Certificate Program plaques at the 20th Anniversary Georgia Organics Conference. CAES News
Journeyman Farmers
Cheered on by the more than 1,000 attendees at the 20th Anniversary Georgia Organics Conference, four fledgling Georgia farmers celebrated their graduation from Georgia’s Journeyman Farmer Certificate Program — an innovative training program for beginning farmers.
Damage caused by cowpea curculio on Southern peas. CAES News
Black-eyed Peas
Black-eyed peas have long been a symbol of New Year’s luck in the American South, but black-eyed pea farmers aren’t feeling that fortunate this year.
As of Dec. 27, 2016, this map of Georgia shows areas that are experiencing abnormally dry or drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Image credit: USDA Drought Monitor. CAES News
Georgia Drought
Welcome rains during December 2016 and the first week of 2017 are providing hope for Georgia farmers looking for relief from a statewide severe drought, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia agricultural climatologist and UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016. CAES News
Greenhouses and High Tunnels
From the miracle of December tomatoes to the marvel of fresh salad greens in space, greenhouses and growth chambers may play an increasing role in creating hyperlocal or hyperportable food systems.