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156 results found for Commercial Vegetables
As of Dec. 27, 2016, this map of Georgia shows areas that are experiencing abnormally dry or drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Image credit: USDA Drought Monitor. CAES News
Georgia Drought
Welcome rains during December 2016 and the first week of 2017 are providing hope for Georgia farmers looking for relief from a statewide severe drought, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia agricultural climatologist and UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016. CAES News
Greenhouses and High Tunnels
From the miracle of December tomatoes to the marvel of fresh salad greens in space, greenhouses and growth chambers may play an increasing role in creating hyperlocal or hyperportable food systems.
Pictured is a rain simulator used by UGA scientists on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Rain Simulator
A simulated rain research project coordinated by two University of Georgia scientists is aimed at enhancing and improving vegetable production.
Pictured is an adult whitefly feeding on a tomato leaf.
Picture taken by Saioa Legarrea/UGA. CAES News
Combating Whiteflies
Whitefly populations in south Georgia have exploded over the past several weeks, troubling vegetable producers during the fall growing season, according to University of Georgia horticulturist Tim Coolong.
CAES News
Ag Tour
From watching how a peach is picked, packaged and delivered, to learning how federal and state regulators ensure that only the highest quality produce is shipped from Georgia, the fourth annual state agriculture tour covered a wide range of agricultural topics.
GM crops chart CAES News
GMO Safety
Genetically modified foods are tested for safety testing before they reach the marketplace. It can take over a decade and cost tens of millions of dollars, and as a result, GMOs are the most safety-tested foods in history, says University of Georgia plant breeding and plant genetics expert Wayne Parrott.
A picture of a corn field from a few years ago. Recent rains have helped this year's corn crop, according to UGA Extension specialist Eric Prostko. CAES News
Road Trip
Like many other young people, plant pathology graduate student Russell Ingram’s friends have an epic road trip planned for this summer. The difference is that instead of setting off for a music festival in the desert or visiting a beach, Ingram’s pals are hitting the road in search of jobs.
Georgia's April 2016 Precipitation - NOAA CAES News
April Weather
Cool conditions early in April delayed the growth of watermelon seedlings and caused yellowing of some corn plants. Wet fields in the southern half of the state delayed planting and caused problems for corn seedlings and other plants in heavy, wet soils.
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens. CAES News
Organic Farming Classes
University of Georgia organic agriculture experts and economists are teaming up to present the Organic Farming Workshop to provide farmers with new ways to maximize the ecology and economical sustainability of their farm.