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The fruit husks contain the highest concentration of juglone on the tree. (Photo by Franklin Bonner, USFS, ret., Bugwood.org) CAES News
Killer Tree
When you look into your garden or backyard, be careful not to ignore your black walnut (Juglans nigra) tree. Lurking inside its leaves, fruits and roots is a pesticide made to control competition.
Oconee County's team took first place in this year's state forestry contest. Pictured are (left to right) Henry Walker, owner of Walker Tree Farm; coach April McDaniel, team members Robie Lucas, Lexi Pritchard, Alyssa Haag and Thomas Stewart; Telfair County Agricultural and Natural Resources Extension Agent Colby Royal, and Oconee County 4-H Educator Daniel Queen. CAES News
4-H Forestry
Georgia 4-H’ers participated in the 2022 State Forestry Field Day on Sept. 25 at the Henry Walker Tree Farm in Jacksonville, Georgia. The state contest consists of five stations: insect and disease identification, volume estimation, compass and pacing, tree identification, and site evaluation.
Pine trees on the UGA Westbrook Farm in Griffin, Ga. (file photo) CAES News
Tax Guide
Keeping up with changes in Georgia’s property tax laws is a full-time job, and a new book shows the fruits of these efforts.
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia. CAES News
No Relief
Agricultural producers in the region damaged most by Hurricane Michael are struggling to recover from this disaster without additional federal assistance, even as the 2019 spring planting season is now fully underway. A recent survey of Cooperative Extension county agents in Florida and Georgia showed that there is a great deal of continued uncertainty about future production in affected areas.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Timber Stands
A forested stand with fewer quality trees is often healthier than a forested stand with a greater density. Small-acreage landowners should consider using the Timber Stand Improvement Method.
Wildlife management efforts on small acreage are not in vain. These plots may not forever hold a flock of turkeys, a covey of quail, or a trophy buck, but they often become important parts of these animals' range. The photo of this buck was taken by a wildlife camera on a 7-acre lot. CAES News
Managing Wildlife
While implementing habitat improvements on a small property can provide homes to small mammals, songbirds, reptiles and amphibians, the home ranges of large mammals and several birds often encapsulate several hundred acres.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Agroforestry & Wildlife
Pine straw production, timber sales and wildlife management will top the list of topics at the Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day slated for Thursday, Sept. 20, at the University of Georgia’s Westbrook Research Farm in Griffin, Georgia.
Thinning pine stands benefits the timber stand and the owner. Reducing stand density reduces competition for nutrients, space and light and improves the vigor, growth rate and overall quality of the remaining trees. CAES News
Thinning Pines
Proper management of a pine stand requires thinning in order to prevent disease and insect infestation and to maximize profit. Thinning is the process of cutting or removing certain trees from a stand to regulate the number, quality and distribution of the remaining trees.
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website — a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date climate information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel. CAES News
Climate Learning Network
Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF), in collaboration with eXtension, an online learning resource for Cooperative Extension System professionals, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have launched the Climate Learning Network (CLN) website, climatelearning.net, as a clearinghouse for the most up-to-date information for farmers, homeowners, natural resources professionals and Extension personnel.