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University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing. CAES News
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing.
Handwashing Tips
Back to school for Georgia students means reuniting with friends, reminiscing about summer and, unfortunately, sharing germs that could lead to various illnesses.
A baby sleeps in his crib. Photo taken Aug. 9, 2009. CAES News
A baby sleeps in his crib. Photo taken Aug. 9, 2009.
Sleep Well
Sleep is your body’s way of restoring itself. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most Americans need at least seven hours of sleep a night.
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers. CAES News
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers.
Poultry Health
Like human infants, baby chicks are born without immunity to many common diseases. Immunizations are the answer, but it can be hard to immunize entire flocks of chickens in an efficient manner. That’s where poultry health specialists like Brian Jordan come in.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
Metabolism Genetics
As far as poultry farmers are concerned, feed equals money. The more efficient chickens are at turning feed into thighs, breast and drumsticks, the healthier their bottom line. It turns out that the same science that can help poultry farmers raise more feed-efficient chickens could help people become healthier, too.
What may look like an ordinary live Christmas tree to many people can turn into a sneezing fest for allergy sufferers. And with their dust and mold, fake trees can be just as bad. CAES News
What may look like an ordinary live Christmas tree to many people can turn into a sneezing fest for allergy sufferers. And with their dust and mold, fake trees can be just as bad.
Asthma Triggers
Even in the south, where winters can be mild, people tend to spend more time sealed up inside during the colder seasons. While spending time inside keeps you safe from the elements, it can expose those with asthma to more of the indoor air pollutants that can trigger asthma attacks.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport.
Combatting Rural Stress
The challenges facing rural America today are diverse, and the answers to rural issues won’t come from a single expert or institution.
Caffeine does not cause an increased risk of heart disease. However, people who have heart disease should consult their health care providers about caffeine intake.
Studies suggest that caffeine intake may protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke. CAES News
Caffeine does not cause an increased risk of heart disease. However, people who have heart disease should consult their health care providers about caffeine intake.
Studies suggest that caffeine intake may protect against Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke.
Coffee Intake
Many people start their day with a cup of coffee, and that’s not necessarily a bad habit. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers moderate caffeine intake to be 300 milligrams of coffee each day. That’s two to four cups. And studies show that coffee, in moderation, can promote a variety of health benefits.
Denise Everson talks to a class about making healthy food choices to limit their risk of developing cancer. CAES News
Denise Everson talks to a class about making healthy food choices to limit their risk of developing cancer.
Healthier Georgians
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension focuses on improving the quality of life and health of Georgia residents. Georgia Extension agents and specialists develop programs that help families to engage in physical activity, decrease obesity, live with cancer and diabetes, prepare meals safely, and eat healthily while stretching their food dollars.
Flor Campos-Robles, a fifth-grade Clarke County 4-H member from Athens, Georgia, won third place with her poster featuring a house that appears to be feeling under weather and warns about the dangers of radon. CAES News
Flor Campos-Robles, a fifth-grade Clarke County 4-H member from Athens, Georgia, won third place with her poster featuring a house that appears to be feeling under weather and warns about the dangers of radon.
Radon Poster Contest
Household radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., but the hazards of this dangerous gas are still relatively unknown to many Georgia families.
The research team, led by University of Georgia's Steven Stice and Augusta University's Nasrul Hoda, created a treatment called "AB126" using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells.  CAES News
The research team, led by University of Georgia's Steven Stice and Augusta University's Nasrul Hoda, created a treatment called "AB126" using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. 
Georgia Bio Awards
Two of five Georgia Bio Awards presented last month to University of Georgia faculty were programs either in or affiliated with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES).